Ghost In The Box? NOT

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TESTING THE VALIDITY OF THE GHOST BOX AS A TOOL FOR PARANORMAL INVESTIGATION

Mitch Silverstein1, Stephanie Bohn1, Kenny Biddle2
1Nyack Paranormal- contact@nyackparanormal.com http://nyackparanormal.com
2ParaInvestigator- parainvestigator@comcast.net

February 21, 2015

ABSTRACT: The Ghost Box is a widely used device for paranormal investigating. We question the level of objectivity by those using this device. Respondents were sent a one minute recording from a Shack Hack Ghost Box and asked to respond to a questionnaire. We analyzed the results and explored the workings of these devices. The findings tell us that the interpretation of results by those who use this tool is very biased and subjective. The results collected in the field should not be put forth as evidence of paranormal activity.


INTRODUCTION

As a modern and portable version of the Frank’s Box by Frank Sumption (developed in 2002 for spirit communication [1]), the Ghost Box (also known as a Spirit Box) has been the center of debate for many years among ghost hunters and paranormal investigators. It debuted in the market somewhere around 2006 through TV show exposure; several designs have been developed since. Basically it is a portable battery operated radio which has been altered to scan the spectrum of radio frequencies within the range capable of the unit’s specifications. Early versions were an easy “hack” and more recent versions have added features such as an adjustable sweep speed and built in recorder. All in all they all do the same thing it was originally designed for, receiving radio broadcasts.

We will be conducting a series of experiments and research projects covering many of the tools that the typical paranormal investigator relies on for results.  Here we seek to test out the viability of the Ghost Box and report our interpretation of the findings. We believe that the level of bias in the interpretation of responses from the ghost box is high and subjective to the point that it cannot offer objective and useful data in an investigation.

METHOD

For this experiment we created a survey to seek feedback from an actual recording made with a Ghost Box. The request for participants was published on social media asking for help with a ghost box study. No details were provided at the time. Ninety eight (98) respondents were sent a questionnaire (Figure 1) to seek feedback from a one minute long Ghost Box recording (Link: http://nyackparanormal.com/GB/QuesAM.mp3 ). These respondents were randomly separated into two groups based on order of response.

The recording was made using a “Shack Hack” (Radio Shack Digital AM/FM Pocket Radio Catalog # 12-469: Figure 2) connected to a digital voice recorder (RCA Model VR5320R-A). The audio file was transferred to PC and converted to MP3 to match the original raw file, no manipulation or noise reduction was used. A one minute segment was captured for this experiment.

Group A would hear the one minute recording and Group B would hear the same recording with an additional three seconds of audio at the beginning that included the question: “What is your occupation?” There was no other manipulation to the recording or difference between the two sample recordings.

FIGURE 1- Survey Form

 

 


Photo: M. Silverstein

RESULTS

Group A had 19 completed responses out of 49 (39%) and group B had 17 responses out of 49 (35%).

The results of the survey were compiled into a spreadsheet (see Appendix) with the perceived words mapped out to their time stamp along with the survey answers.

We found that there were consistent words and/or sounds across the respondents reporting results. Table 1 shows the words and/or sounds with two or more like responses located within 4 seconds of their timestamps.

TABLE 1- Words from multiple responses

                                                                             Of all responders/36       Responders hearing words/18

1-4 sec          will, we’ll, well, wheels                   (8/36=22%).                         44%

4-5                 voice, sports, porch                         (4/36=11%)                           22%

20-22             problem, problems                          (9/36=25%)                          50%

25                  mom                                                 (2/36=6%)                             12%

26-27             polka, OK, hey look                          (3/36=8%)                         16%

35-37             cyst, sis or sit                                   (10/36=28%}                        56%

39-40             snow or no                                       (5/36=14%)                         28%       

52-55             backward, Blackburn, actor             (6/36=17%)                      34%

56-59             What if, what is, when it, etc          (8/36=22%)                       44%

Of these responses we noted:

Group A- those noting a response (n=10): Mean 6.6 responses each were noted.

Group B- those noting a response (n=8): Mean 3.6 responses each were noted.

Statistical Analysis:

The mean number of responses from each group was run through a t-test [2] to see if the results are considered statistically significant. The average number of words heard for each group was put through the calculation (Table 2); Group A heard an average of almost twice as many words (174%) as Group B but the difference is not statistically significant solely because of the small sample size (as an exercise, we increased the total number of respondents yet kept the same ratio of words heard and the results were statistically significant).

Table 2- Statistical calculator based on the T-test at 0.05 Level of Significance.
Testing for Statistical Significance in Controlled Experiments

 

TRENDS

Trend 1

Group A- # people reporting responses vs no responses
10 out of 19                                                               53%

Group B- # people reporting responses vs no responses
9 out of 18                                                                 50%

We found this interesting that both groups are about even in value. These show the groups were well sorted by random distribution.

Trend 2

One participant deemed the Ghost Box as an effective tool for investigating=3%. 61% stated it is ineffective and 36% are undecided of the responses to this question (Table 3).

Table 3- Survey Responses

E/I/U= Effective, Ineffective, undecided

Group A               E              I              U             n= 19 (one (1) no response to this question) 18

                              1              10           7

 

Group B               E              I              U             n= 18 (three (3) with no response to this question) 15

                               0              10           5

 

Overall                E              I              U             n=37 (33 responses)

                            1              20           12

                            3%          61%         36%

 

DISCUSSION

Generally the use of the Ghost box in paranormal investigation is inherently subjective and the units are flawed in design.

We did see a trend that showed bias towards seeking a specific response based on the question asked of the “spirits.” The difference can be attributed to confirmation bias [3]. Group B that was posed the question would have been specifically listening for a response that would fit the question. They may not report words that did not fit the suspected answer besides the most obvious. This coincides with our hypothesis but the sample size is too small to lend statistical significance to these findings.

Only one respondent stated the ghost box is considered an effective tool. 36% are undecided as to the effectiveness of the ghost box as a tool and the rest, more than half at 61%, stated it was ineffective. There seems to be little confidence in this sampling that any results of value can be obtained.

Random Words

The divergence between some of the sets of sound-alike words is interesting to note; it illustrates how responses may be open to interpretation. Table 5 shows the sets of words and phrases that were heard at the same time by multiple participants.

Table 5- Word Sets

1. Voice, sports, porch, course, boy.

2. Wheels, will, we all, we’ll keep, well, we’ll.

3. Wiccan, breaking, Courtney, court case.

4. Trouble, problem, problems, cobblestone, hobbit soup.

5. Polka, OK, hey look.

6. Sit, assist, upstairs, sis, cyst.

7. Snow, no.

8. Backwards, whatever, blackburn, actor.

9. Wooden, what if, when it, one of, what is.

Apart from the contents of Table 5, and even more interesting, we were able to find four random words with no sound-alike words whatsoever. Three of these words were heard during the recording without the question (Group A); “Jennifer,” “recall,” and “key.” The fact that it was a name, Jennifer; a quasi-command, recall; and something mysterious, like a key; was interesting because it was as if their subconscious mind was trying to form something that might have meaning to the investigator or to the spirit, possibly out of nothing. One random word was heard during the recording with the question (Group B), “What is your occupation?”, the word “end,” which could be seen as pertaining to the state of one’s employment. Hearing the question resulted in a word that was possibly drawn from the imagination and not hearing the question caused the mind to grasp for words of meaning in general.

Additionally, in regards to all other responses, being influenced by the question could cause a word that sounds like “backwards” to sound like “actor.” Many more responses were heard in general when the ears of the participants were not specifically listening for the answer to a question.

The Radio

Many words did come out clearly from the recording, likely a strong radio broadcast signal. Also, several were two syllables showing that even a quick scan allows many full words to be heard. We were curious as to how multiple words or phrases have been reported from the use of these instruments so we also tested what we call the frequency overlap, where a broadcast station is strong enough, and the receiver is of the level of quality, to pick up the same broadcast on the adjoining frequencies both lower and higher on the dial.

Scan Test

A manual scan one station at a time was done with the Shack Hack and the very popular P-SB7 (Table 4). For the Shack Hack it was noted that the FM station at 107.1 was also coming through rather clear at 106.9 and 107.3.  Due to strict broadcasting regulations we can assume it is the nature of the radio tuner possibly coupled with atmospheric conditions that may cause this. The target frequencies were typically stronger than the cohorts. More stations with the same effect were found at approximately FM MHz: 90.5-90.7-90.9; 92.7-92.9; 94.1-94.3-94.5; 96.5-96.7-96.9; 97.1-97.3; 98.1-98.3-98.5; 99.5-99.7; 100.5-100.7-100.9; 106.3-106.5

AM KHz: 540-550; 570-580; 660-670-680; 770-780; 880-890; 970-980; 1010-1020; 1050-1060; 1130-1140; 1220-1230-1240; 1550-1560-1570

Figure 3- The P-SB7

Photo: ghoststop.com

With the P-SB7, there was no noticeable overlap along the AM dial, however, with FM, every station broadcast received overlapped with the frequency immediately before & after the designated frequency:  88.5, 89.3, 89.5, 89.7, 90.1, 90.5, 90.9, 91.7, 92.5, 93.3, 93.7, 94.1, 94.5, 95.7, 96.5, 96.9, 97.1, 97.5, 98.1, 98.9, 99.5, 100.3, 100.7, 101.1, 101.5, 102.1, 102.5, 102.9, 103.3, 103.9, 104.5, 105.3, 106.1, 106.9, 107.9
The stronger signals came in on either side of the target frequency almost as clear as the target frequency, easily allowing several syllables and multiple words to be heard at times, depending on the “Sweep Rate” setting. 

Table 4- The description of the popular P-SB7

P-SB7 “ITC Research Device” (as printed on the device)

Eight buttons are provided on the front;

Sweep Rate – Allows the speed to which the device sweeps/scans through frequencies to be adjusted. Sweep rates of 100 ms to 350 ms are available for FM, and 200 ms to 500 ms are available for AM. Both adjust in 50 ms increments.

Back Light – Provides a blue backlight for the LCD screen.

Sweep FWD – Starts the device sweeping through frequencies from lowest to highest. Also allows user to cycle through frequencies manually.

Sweep REV – Starts the devices sweeping through frequencies from highest to lowest. Also allows user to cycle through frequencies manually.
Vol. “+” – Increases volume (Level 30)

Vol. “-“ – Decreases volume

AM/FM – Switches device between receiving AM (KHz) and FM (MHz) frequencies. Available AM frequencies are between 530 KHz and 1710 KHz (119 frequencies). Available FM frequencies are between 76.0 MHz and 108.0 MHz (311 frequencies).

The frequency overlap effectively increases the exposure of any of these radio stations to the scan process.

We also tested this with an unmodified Radio Shack Multi-band Radio Catalog # 20-230. FM frequencies showed much of the same overlapping of frequencies: 90.5-90.7-90.9; 94.1-94.3-94.5; 96.5-96.7-96.9; 97.1-97.3; 98.1-98.3-98.5; 106.3-106.5, however, none of the AM band showed this characteristic, similar to the P-SB7. It does seem this is much a function of the quality of the tuner in the radio. The different models of the ghost box should be checked for these patterns. It seems the ‘cheaper’ radios may have less frequency accuracy. This would expose the Ghost Box listener to a much longer listen at broadcast frequencies increasing the chance of catching longer, clearer words or phrases.

Although using the AM band may mitigate frequency overlap typical of the FM band, AM broadcasts are generally more news and talk shows which increase the chances of catching a spoken word. Both bands have their disadvantages with little or no advantage over the other especially if the unit only provides single band access. These units should have a way to record the frequency at which these words are perceived so one can go back to those stations and review the context of their broadcast.

Coupled with the findings from the frequency overlap, the speed of the scan can make a difference in the interpretation of responses. The newest models of the Ghost Box claim the scan speed can be set to a faster rate than words can be formed or spoken.

Scan Speed

According to our findings, the Shack Hack scans at 5 frequencies per second or 200ms (Figure 4) and two syllable words were easily understood. Either the word(s) spanned 200ms (1/5 of a second) or it spanned two or more adjoining frequencies (up to 600ms or more).

Figure 4- Audio file showing peaks designating the scan rate for the Shack Hack

 

From Scientific American- “When we speak rapidly we are verbalizing at about six syllables per second. That hyperactive radio announcer spewing fine print at the end of a commercial jabbers at 10 syllables per second, the absolute limit of comprehension for sighted people.” Blind people have been found in the same study to be able to comprehend up to 19 syllables/second.[4]

From Wiki: Speakers vary their speed of speaking according to contextual and physical factors. A typical speaking rate for English is 4 syllables per second,[5] but in different emotional or social contexts the rate may vary, one study reporting a range between 3.3 and 5.9 syl/sec,[6] Another study found significant differences in speaking rate between story-telling and taking part in an interview.[7]

These studies and measures show there is a strong possibility and supporting evidence that single and multiple syllables could be heard from the scanning process. Even the  faster scanning units available (down to 50ms) can capture discernible syllables and with frequency overlap, coincidence of context to neighboring broadcasts and a biased ear, words and phrases will be heard. Those investigators claiming longer sentences or phrases must scrutinize the source of their findings in great detail.

Radio Broadcasts

We have also heard many investigators state that there are little or no radio signals in the area they are investigating so any response from the ghost box must be a spirit. In most cases the investigation takes place at night. AM frequencies travel much greater distances due to the bouncing off of the ionosphere in the evening and night time hours. This has led to stricter standards for radio broadcasters with powerful transmitters to reduce power during these hours. There are still distant signals that travel farther during the high point of use for the ghost box. [8] FM signals are effectively stronger and lower to the ground and carry better through buildings. Due to the nature of the wave it holds up much better than AM against noise and interference making words come through more clearly. As an unscientific attempt to see how strong radio signals are at night, we placed the ghost box inside a totally stainless steel dishwasher in an attempt to reduce the reception on the radio but we still picked up most stations with little or no reduction in reception quality.

CONCLUSION

Although a larger sampling of participants would strengthen the support of our hypothesis, we conclude there is enough information to state the Ghost Box is not a proper research tool for paranormal investigating due to the strong bias involved in the use and interpretation of the responses in the field. The intended use of the Ghost Box lends little or no control over the many inherent variables and it solely relies on subjective opinions as to what results are considered valid. The units are flawed in the sense that it will generate syllables by default which guarantees a user with belief in the device will interpret it as a spirit response. We do not present this research to suggest to people what to believe in, we merely support the facts and evidence that perceived results from the ghost box should remain a personal experience and should not be presented as supporting evidence of paranormal activity nor be included in any scientific methodology. Those presenting evidence based on Ghost Box recordings will bear the burden of proof that their findings support their beliefs.

 REFERENCES

1. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/aaron-sagers/inventor-of-franks-box-gh_b_5689238.html

2. Statistical Significance Calculator By Rags Srinivasan

3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias

4. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-can-some-blind-people-process/

5. Cruttenden, A. (2014). Gimson’s Pronunciation of English. Routledge. p. 54.

6. Arnfield, S.; Roach, Setter, Greasley and Horton (1995). “Emotional stress and speech tempo variability”. Proceedings of the ESCA/NATO Workshop on Speech Under Stress: 13–15.

7. Kowal, S.; Wiese and O’Donnell (1983). “The use of time in storytelling”. Language and Speech 26.4: 377–392.

8. http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/why-am-radio-stations-must-reduce-power-change-operations-or-cease-broadcasting-night

  1. 3.     
    APPENDIX- Distribution of responses by responder.

Hazardous Hauntings: The Enemy Within

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

It’s difficult trying to understand why certain types of paranormal activity occurs around some individuals, and yet not others.   It’s even harder trying to make sense of the numerous types of psychokinetic displays put on during poltergeist outbreaks.   At least it used to be.

It is my current belief that if one is willing to take the time and dig deep enough into such cases, looking into environmental variables,  medical backgrounds of the individuals involved, psychological backgrounds, as well as the psychodynamics of the people affected, definitive patterns emerged which are absolutely fascinating.

Patterns which explain why specific types of psychokinetic events occur to certain people, while different ones happen to others.  Patterns which strongly suggest that these supposedly random psychokinetic acts are nothing of the kind.   In reality, evidence indicates they are carefully orchestrated deep within the consciousness of their generators or agents, a.k.a. poltergeist agents.  While these events are not consciously mediated, they are deliberate acts of the subconscious or unconscious acting out upon the immediate environment.

After forty-four years of work, a fascinating longitudinal pattern has emerged strongly suggesting what’s underlying the nature of most, if not all, poltergeists cases.

To put it very simply, WE ARE.

Unfortunately for reality television, there are no demons, entities or monsters, just the externalization of consciousness of  everyday living people.  Well, not everyday living people?

These special people are uniquely, neurologically wired so that their body is highly reactive to forces most of us simply ignore.  The majority of the human population is highly insensitive to these energies, which is why certain types of paranormal activity is so rarely experienced.  Of course, if you watch any of the fraudulent paranormal “un-reality” shows, you might think otherwise?

Out of the more than four thousand cases from my own files, there are many that clearly exemplify this theory, but I’ll focus on only three here.  Two of the three cases are also the best known of my case files as they’ve received the greatest media attention.  They are:  The Entity case and the San Pedro case, while the third case is chapter seven “An Irreplaceable Loss: The Life and Death of a Poltergeist Agent” of my book Aliens Above, Ghosts Below: Explorations of the Unknown.

As most are somewhat familiar with The Entity and San Pedro cases, let me begin with the case that has received absolutely no publicity whatsoever, and that’s the one that affected the lives of Lisa McIntosh, Barry Conrad and myself from 2001 through July of 2006.   This was the last chapter I added to my book before it was published, but not the final chapter.

Lisa McIntosh and Barry Conrad

What began as Lisa informing Conrad upon meeting him online that she moved from one haunted house to another while growing up, turned into the Mount Everest of poltergeist cases, that was very well chronicled due to the logging of events by Conrad and myself.   What was thought to be just another fascinating RSPK outbreak, resulted in a very steep learning curve in terms of our understanding of the nature of this incredible phenomenon.

Lisa moved into Barry’s house from her home in North Carolina in early summer of 2001 and she accompanied us out on her first case in mid-October of that same year.

The case was a very minor one as well as being quite old and dormant.  While our instruments detected rather high geomagnetic and electromagnetic fields, we did not encounter any phenomena at all.  This is quite the norm in such investigations.

However, the very next day, poltergeist activity began transpiring around Lisa and Barry, and before it all ended some five years later,  they had experienced many occurrences.  Between mid-October 2001 and July of 2006, there were probably several thousand separate RSPK events, many were redundant, but nevertheless intense.

One of the more violent events occurred when Barry was away on a late shoot and Lisa was preparing for bed.  As she was beginning to settle under the covers, Barry’s dog Beau, a gift from one of his many girlfriends, began to leap towards the bed to ensure her place next to Lisa.   This dog was very territorial and possessive of her space that Lisa’s presence had now invaded.

Although Lisa had a great love of animals, this large, pesky canine was nothing more than a constant reminder of Barry’s last squeeze.  Put simply, she absolutely despised that dog for that one simple reason.  No great surprise?

In keeping with Beau’s territoriality, she leaped towards the bed not knowing that she was about to get a rude awakening as to just how potent some human minds really are.

Suddenly, something invisible to the eye, abruptly grabbed Beau in mid jump, momentarily suspending the animal in the air.  This was immediately followed by Beau being violently flung backwards away from the bed, into the wall just below the windows in the bedroom.  Had the dog’s trajectory been slightly just slightly higher, she would have flown out the second story bedroom window to her death below.

Lisa let out a very loud scream and was way too frightened to even move, as there had already been numerous poltergeist incidents in the house preceding this event.  She tried calling Barry, but as he was working, his cell phone was turned off and could not be reached.

Beau was stunned into semi-consciousness from hitting the wall and laid there quietly for about ten seconds.  Upon coming it her senses, Beau hunkered down and crawled very rapidly out of the room, never again to enter Barry’s main bedroom.

As shocking as this event was, it really made a great sense in that what we see here is a direct intervention on the part of Lisa’s subconscious mind, via psychokinesis, acting out within her new home (Conrad’s house), to protect her own territory.   But wait, there’s much more to this fascinating young lady named Lisa.

Lisa’s health became somewhat problematic in that her whole body seemed to ache most of the time even though she was not even forty years old.  But as she did not have any health insurance, she simply began consuming vast quantities of over-the-counter pain pills like Aleve, Tylenol, etc.    Initially, this appeared to help, but she seemed to have a chronic, low grade fever and as she had an intense dislike of physicians, she initially did not even desire to be properly diagnosed.

Some months later, after numerous poltergeist events like doors violently opening and closing, disembodied voices, the sounds of large explosions, telephones incessantly ringing with no caller at the other end, fierce growling voices heard over the phone lines, and even luminous anomalies, the escalating events took a rather odd and ominous turn.

While Lisa and Barry were watching TV early one evening in his living room, they heard a disturbance in the kitchen.  Both they and the dog got up to investigate unusual noise.

As they entered the dinning room on the way to the kitchen area they observed a really bizarre apparition before them.  In fact, this apparition was so distinct and extraordinary that I wouldn’t have even believed it had it come from someone other than Barry and Lisa.

There before them was a gigantic, twisting, convoluted 3-D image of the letter “M”, in a dirty, dark brown/black shade of color.  What the hell?

As Lisa and Barry stood there in utter amazement, this mind-boggling apparition continued its twisting motions, with no apparent sound, aside form that of the dog that was growling at it as it hunched down into an attack posture.  Suddenly, the dog lets out a yelp, and runs away with it’s tail between it’s legs.

Then, just as suddenly as it appeared, it was gone.  Barry and Lisa looked at each other wondering what they’ve just witnessed.  They immediately called me to discuss it.

I must say, that this is perhaps the most peculiar apparition I’ve ever heard about, period.   What in the world does “M” mean, other than Lisa’s last name, McIntosh.  But that’s way too obvious to be relevant.

Twenty three months later though, the letter “M” became very relevant to both Lisa and Barry, in a way no one could have ever predicted.

Lisa finally consented to see a physician regarding her chronic aches and pains.  After an exhaustive battery of tests, the answer to Lisa’s malaise was finally known.   She’s diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma (MM), and insidious and untreatable form of bone cancer (cancer of plasma cells) that usually only afflicts the elderly.

As depressing as her diagnosis was, what’s even more astounding is the “M” relevance here to the apparition her and Barry witnessed some two years earlier.

Was it only a coincidence that the apparition they saw was in the form of the letter “M, or was Lisa’s subconscious mind acting out within her immediate environment trying to communicate what was really going on within her body at the time?   As neither Lisa or Barry had ever heard of this illness, which was normal as they weren’t physicians, there was no direct way that such information could have been conveyed to either of them.   In my professional opinion, this is matter is so far beyond the point of it being a coincidence, that it’s truly astounding.

Unfortunately, Lisa lost her battle to cancer on July of 2006, and shortly thereafter, all the psychokinetic episodes within Barry’s house ceased.  Of course they did, the biological generator or agent was now gone.

For a far more detailed account of this case, read chapter seven of my book.

The next case that displayed the same type of overtly obvious psychokinetic link was the San Pedro case (1989-1993) with Jackie Hernandez.

The most blatant and direct events in this fascinating case are the numerous occasions where the RSPK directly attacked Jeff Wheatcraft.

On the very first night of our visit in August of 1989, Jeff’s camera was violently pulled from his hands as attempted to shoot some photos in the attic of Jackie’s little bungalow on 11th Street in San Pedro.   Jeff’s reaction is pure fear and some disbelief, as he was somewhat of a skeptic when it came too paranormal matters.  But the worse was ahead.

On September 4th, while Jeff was exploring the attic once again, this time with Gary Beihm (a friend of Conrad’s), something suddenly wrapped a clothesline cord around Jeff’s neck and tried to hang him, by lifting his body over a bolt in one of the many rafters.  Jeff let out a loud yell as this event transpired.

Had Gary not been in the attic with Jeff at that moment, there’s a real good chanced that Jeff would have died of strangulation by that clothesline.

Jeff Wheatcraft being hung in San Pedro case, 9/4/89

Can you imagine the legal complications facing Barry Conrad, Gary Beihm and Jackie Hernandez if Jeff would have died then and there?  How could you possibly defend someone in a case like this?

Jeff was left with a serious rope burn in his neck that’s clearly visible as he descends from the attic after the attack.  Needless to say, Jeff is shocked and for good reason, and backs away from helping us on this case, but not totally.  He’s about to learn what a bad judgment call that was.

Months later, Jackie finally left San Pedro and moved up to a trailer park in Weldon, CA near Bakersfield.  Barry and Jeff, traveled three hundred miles north to visit Jackie as she was still having poltergeist events around her.

Yours truly was sidelined for a while as my father had suffered a heart attack and my mother required my assistance at many levels.  While at Jackie’s new home, they encountered numerous RSPK events that culminated in yet another, almost lethal attack on Jeff Wheatcraft.

Jeff Wheatcraft being hanged in San Pedro, 1989.
Jeff Wheatcraft being hanged in San Pedro, 1989.

While playing with a Ouija Board in Jackie’s home, Barry, Jeff, Jackie and several others experiencing table shaking, inexplicable cold winds from nowhere and some rather obscure messages from the board.  However, they all paled compared to what was about to occur.

Suddenly, Jeff and his chair were levitated up into the air, with the chair falling away while he continued in his upward arc of movement until he was violently slammed into the meeting of the ceiling and wall.   Jeff’s limp, unconscious body soon hit the floor.  Everyone assumed he was dead.  Fortunately, they were wrong.

Jeff described a sensation of his diaphragm being compressed and sensing a vertical lifting motion which was soon followed by his back and head being slammed into the wall and ceiling.   He woke up on the floor, not really knowing what had just happened to him.

What makes these recurring attacks on Jeff relevant in this discussion is how they are linked directly backed to Jackie Hernandez’s state-of-mind at the time.

Jackie grew very found of Barry Conrad, and why not.  He’s affable, tall, handsome with blue eyes and has come to Jackie’s aid in her time of need. Jackie became very attached to Barry emotionally as he was sort of her rescuer and savior, although she misinterpreted his help as a romantic overture to a single mother, as he very flirtatious .  But there was one real problem with Barry as far as Jackie was concerned and it had little to do with Barry himself.

The problem for Jackie was that every time Barry was at her home, Jeff was with him, acting as a wedge or impedance to her growing closer to Barry, at least a far as Jackie was concerned.  Jackie attempted to correct this “problem” the only way she could….to unleash her RSPK onto Jeff.

Thus, it’s no coincidence that Jeff was repeatedly attacked while in Jackie’s presence by invisible forces as Jackie was doing everything within her “power” to assure that Jeff no longer returned to her home with Barry again, and it came pretty damn close to succeeding.

At one point during an interview with the magazine show Hard Copy in 1993, I asked Jackie on camera about my suspicions regarding her feelings about Jeff.  Jackie readily acknowledged and admitted that my thinking on this matter was entirely correct.

However, the producer of this particular story didn’t quite understand what I was referring to here with Jackie, which prompted her to ask me a question:  “So you mean that Jackie tells the ghost what to do and the ghost does it, right?”  WRONG.

No matter how hard I tried to get this producer to understand my theory here, she couldn’t grasp what I was saying.   And needless to say, they edited out this entire aspect of the show as it didn’t support their contention that it was all due to a ghost and was far too complex for most viewers to comprehend.

There were other major indicators and evidence of Jackie being a blatant poltergeist agent and they are discussed in detail within chapter three of my book and how the localized environment played into the entire case and beyond.

To learn more about how and why Jackie suddenly developed this psychokinetic proclivity, read my book or another blog here “Looking A Gift Ghost in the Mouth:  The Science of Poltergeists”.  It no coincidence that as new tenants eventually moved into, and soon out of, Jackie’s 11th street San Pedro home, many also had run ins with poltergeist activity.

Saving the best known of my cases for the last, we’re now talking about the The Entity case from the middle 1970’s.

In a nutshell, Doris Bither claimed to have been repeatedly raped by ghosts, where two small one would hold her down while the large, third one assaulted her.  As you’ll read in my book, Doris was subjected to frequently recurring episodes of belligerent poltergeist activity, the zenith of which were the alleged rapes and the appearance of the apparition all twenty-five of us collectively observed.

Doris Bither framed by arc of light in The Entity case, Summer 1974

Why alleged you might ask?  Because we could not prove or disprove that such events ever really occurred as they happened long before we met her in August of 1974.  One cannot prove a negative, only a positive.

What’s particularly fascinating about The Entity case is that Doris had a family consisting of three sons and one daughter.  There was one older, larger, teenage son, while the other sons were somewhat younger and smaller.  I think you can figure out where I’m going with this, can’t you?

It’s not very difficult to see the Oedipal correlations here, as Doris was a very sexually driven woman, who very likely possessed strong subliminal, libidinous fantasies about her three boys, especially when binge drinking, which, for her, was quite common.

These were strong, subconscious projections from Doris who some might say was sexually insatiable, and it’s more likely than not that she deeply desired her three young, strong, vibrant sons to please her in ways she could only dream about.  Such an intense incestuous relationship would prove to Doris troubled mind that she’s indeed wanted and needed by the men closest to her, her three sons.

Given the background Doris grew up in, where she was intensely rejected and eventually disinherited by her family at a very young age, she was in desperate need of attention and physical love from men at every level.

The relationship between Doris and her children was extremely chaotic and dysfunctional to say the least.  Such feelings are not that uncommon in society, while the psychokinetic acting out of Doris’s sexual fantasies is VERY UNCOMMON.

If you know anything about clinical psychology and/or psychoanalysis, you’ll understand and appreciate what I’m speaking about here.

In science there’s something called Ockham’s Razor, which basically means that all things being equal, you always go with the simplest explanation.  And in these extraordinary cases, the evidence strongly suggests the causal agent was anything other than a discarnate personality.

In a peculiar sort of way, these scenarios are somewhat reminiscent of “Monsters From The Id” as depicted in the 1956 motion picture Forbidden Planet, a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”, wherein the indigenous alien residents (the Krell) of a planet within a distant star system developed technology that could translate their thoughts and whims into energy and matter that they then could project anywhere on the planet.  Only later, did the Krell discover that their unconscious whims, wants, needs and fears were guiding the process, which eventually led to their own destruction.  Does this science fiction plot seem strangely familiar?

What’s being theoretically postulated here regarding humanly mediated psychokinesis is pretty much the same as in Forbidden Planet with one glaring exception; we don’t have the technology to create such incredible effects.  Although in the real world, it appears as if the interrelationship between certain individuals and their physical environment may serve as a poor man’s substitute. Then again, maybe it’s a good thing that we do not possess such advanced psychotronic technology given our predilection for violence?

Remember, real science is where your theory conforms to your data, not the reverse, where you only seek data that supports your theory, that’s quackery.

What do you think?