Dr. Barry Taff: A Veteran Of The Psychic Wars

By

Sean Casteel and John Weigle

Dr. Barry Taff has been on the forefront of the academic study of psychic phenomena for decades and has long documented the connection between psi events and UFOs. His own psychic experiences began in childhood, and he has no doubt of the reality of some form of coupling between human consciousness and a field of energy that we do not as yet understand.

Taff spoke on March 9, 2013, at a meeting of the Close Encounter Research Organization, which earlier this year added the word “international” to its name and is seeking to branch out worldwide in the dissemination of UFO and alien abduction information. The meeting was held in Thousand Oaks, California, a city located just north of Los Angeles.

Taff opened his lecture by reciting part of a poem by T.S. Elliot that Taff felt eloquently expressed the fluid nature of time and the human mind:

“Time present and time past,” the poem reads, in part, “Are both perhaps present in time future. And time future contained in time past. If all time is eternally present, All time is unredeemable. What might have been is an abstraction, Remaining a perpetual possibility.”

Taff moved on to declare, “There is no paranormal. It’s normal.” He said that long-term memories are not stored in our brains, they’re kept in a remote source outside of us, which relates to the T.S. Elliot poem and his grappling with the nature of memory and time.

From there, Taff began to recount his own history of psychic experiences, beginning with an incident that happened when he was ten years old. In grade school, a young girl approached him and he asked her what the weird bag was that she was wearing. He didn’t know at that age that such a bag was used after a colostomy. The young girl screamed and told the principal, who called Taff into his office and asked if he had looked under the girl’s dress or sneaked into the girls’ bathroom. Taff told the principal he had x-ray vision and pointed out that he could see that the principal had unhealed keloid scar tissue himself. The principal then called Taff’s parents, and they said, “Don’t ask.”

Taff joked that if he had a dollar for every one of his psychic experiences, he would be a whole lot wealthier.

As a child, Taff predicted the assassination of John Kennedy to his parents a couple of years before the event. His parents insisted on making a bet in the belief that young Taff would be proven wrong. They didn’t speak to Taff for ten days, he said, after the prediction came true.

In 1968, Taff was visiting a girlfriend at her house when he decided he wanted some iced tea, which his girlfriend didn’t keep around. At that same moment, Taff’s father saw Taff enter the house, go to the refrigerator and drink iced tea from the pitcher. But Taff had never left his girlfriend’s house. Although his parents never drank iced tea, the pitcher was partially empty the next morning, as though someone had drank from it prior to Taff’s seeing the pitcher of tea the next day.

It was difficult to photograph Taff as a child, he said, and once, when he and a colleague were visiting a TV show producer, a photograph was taken of Taff and his colleague in which the other person showed up perfectly but where Taff had been standing the photo showed only a flash of light.

With this strange history behind him, Taff became a researcher of psychic phenomena in an academic setting, eventually earning a doctorate in psychophysiology with a minor in biomedical engineering from UCLA in 1975. From 1970 to 1987, he was involved in the study of remote viewing.

“What we saw blew us away,” he said.

When using the techniques of remote viewing, according to Taff, both past and future information are available, and it is possible to see information from a great distance. The evidence suggests that our brain, consciousness and space-time work in the same way. As part of the testing of remote viewing, Taff and his associates were given remote viewing “targetsand when they reported what they saw, they provided   information on Trident submarines. The tape recordings made of the remote viewing experiments were later confiscated by representatives of an unnamed intelligence agency because of the classified details contained therein. Taff and his group later performed additional work for intelligence agencies with mixed results.

Unfortunately, Taff said, when understanding the implications of remote viewing and the nature of time, one is forced to conclude that there is no such thing as free will. He offered a story by way of example. In college, he was working with a girl in the psych lab when he had a dream of her going home and being involved in a car accident. In the dream, he saw a driver he thought was himself, so he broke off the relationship in the hope that he could change the future. The girl got involved with another man, and he was the driver in the accident that occurred. Nothing could alter the fulfillment of the precognitive dream, and thus the will of the participants was not free.

“I’ve lost a lot of friends and colleagues because of my work in this field,” Taff lamented, because they were frightened or put off by what he said or things that occurred in his presence.

Taff’s work on the case that became the novel “The Entity” brought him some degree of fame. In August 1974, he and some of his colleagues in parapsychology met a woman who said her house was haunted and that she had been repeatedly raped by ghosts. Taff wrote a big “P” on her report form, meaning he considered it a psychiatric case. Then the woman’s neighbors started seeing things. A skillet flew out of a cupboard. The bedroom felt like it was refrigerated, but it wasn’t. There was an odor of decaying matter. A green light double the size of Taff’s fist appeared and slowly turned into the form of an upper torso. When it disappeared, two of Taff’s assistants passed out.

The team later sealed off the rooms to prevent any light from coming in and prepared a grid on the walls so they could pinpoint any strange things that happened. They shot hundreds of frames of film that showed nothing unusual, but everyone saw things in the room during the filming. The team members wrote down their observations before conferring together and found that their stories matched when they discussed them.

Taff helped write the eventual novel “The Entity,” saying that not everything in the book actually happened. He appears as the slightly fictionalized character “Gene Kraft.” A movie starring Barbara Hershey and Ron Silver was released in 1983. A capsule recounting of the plot is included in “Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide” that reads, in part, “A woman is raped repeatedly by a giant, invisible mass. Her psychiatrist thinks it’s all in the mind until parapsychologists set a trap for the critter.”

There is an article posted on Taff’s website at http://barrytaff.net entitled “The Psi-UFO Connection: What On Earth Is Going On?” In it, Taff writes of a rather fascinating yet obscure relationship between paranormal experiences and UFO encounters.

“Why is it that many CE-III’s and IV’s have paranormal fallout following the event?” he asks. “Why is it that certain people who have frequent paranormal experiences are more likely to experience a UFO encounter?”

Taff goes on to say that it is obviously not scientifically valid to try to explain one phenomenon by recourse to the other, but there is a “longitudinal continuity” between the two kinds of events that may one day help to explain them both.

In his lecture to CERO International, he offered the case history of Judy, another woman with whom he was romantically involved. There is a more detailed version of the story in the aforementioned article on his website.

“I met a beautiful girl on Valentine’s Day (1977) while investigating a case in the mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles,” Taff writes. “This girl was so physically stunning to me that it was impossible to stop staring at her.”

The case he was investigating was a very weak one and no follow up work was done. But he and Judy ended up in a very intense relationship. As time passed, there were repeated episodes of RSPK (Recurrent Spontaneous Psycho-Kinesis) activity culminating in “a large glowing sphere of light emerging from the lumbar region of her back” while Taff was giving her a massage. The clocks in Judy’s condo would all frequently “desynchronize” and run at different speeds.

“All of this paranormal activity was kind of an added bonus to being in a relationship with her,” Taff writes. “At least I thought it was. Boy, was I wrong.”

Taff writes that they both felt it was a perfect relationship and that Judy turned out to be a gifted psychic who also worked with the psi training groups at the UCLA lab as well as on missing persons cases. Taff expected that he and Judy would be engaged within six months, but “fate had something else in mind.” He began to have repeated precognitive dreams in which he was given the message that their romance would end on July 22, 1977. The reasons for the split were never provided in the dreams.

He never told Judy about the dreams because she might misinterpret what he said as expressing a desire to leave her. The dreams stopped, and his happiness was restored. When July 22 came around, he had almost forgotten the dreams entirely. He awoke to find Judy beside him in bed, sobbing and shivering under the covers. She asked Taff why he hadn’t helped her the previous night.

When Taff asked her what she meant, she told him that she “had awakened to find the room brilliantly lit, but the lights were not on. She was levitated up out of the bed, eventually finding herself in a round, metallic-walled room where she was strapped to a metallic table around her wrists, neck, ankles and abdomen. There were tiny men who had skin like a snake or reptile and a face without ears or noses, with large black eyes, who were poking and prodding her everywhere, but especially in every bodily orifice.”

Judy could hear the little men speaking though their lipless mouths were not moving.

“They kept saying that they weren’t going to hurt her, even though that’s exactly what they were doing. The next thing she remembered was waking up in bed with me soundly sleeping next to her.”

Taff writes that he asked her if she knew anything about UFO abductions, which she did not. Although she was very interested in the paranormal, UFOs held no interest for her. Taff finally coaxed her out from beneath the covers and was shocked to find that Judy had bruises at her neck, waist, wrists, abdomen and ankles – consistent with her claim that she had been restrained on the metallic table. And she was bleeding from every orifice, bearing out her story that she had been poked and prodded in those same locations.

Judy subsequently had a complete breakdown, “becoming almost totally delusional with overt signs of dissociation. She never sought any help from anyone and she never, even marginally, recovered. She became a religious zealot, but of a very unusual type. Needless to say, our relationship ended on that day, just as my dream had predicted. From occasional contact with her over the subsequent years, she claims to have been re-abducted many times. It’s one thing to lose a potential mate, but not to something like this.”

At the CERO International lecture, Taff touched on another case that he also writes about in the same online article. He received a phone call in the mid-1970s from a local television network executive who complained about poltergeist activity in his home. Over time, he reported occasional luminous anomalies, disembodied voices, banging noises and problems with electrical items in the house. Both the executive and his family seemed “quite grounded, normal, stable and well-adjusted.” Eventually the man’s calls ceased. Then one night, while the man and his wife were on a road trip in northern California, they saw what they thought was a small, burning plane about to crash into the hills to their right.

“They drove up to where they assumed the plane had crashed,” Taff writes, “and after rounding a bend, they ran into a very unexpected sight. A shocking and terrifying visage to say the least. Sitting on the ground in front of them was a classic flying saucer, maybe 30 to 50 feet in diameter. And if that wasn’t difficult to enough to absorb, there were several diminutive humanoids in tight-fitting flight suits moving around the area around the saucer, as if looking for something. The beings were about four feet tall with grayish-brown skin, large, black almond-shaped eyes with no apparent nose or outer ears. Classic grays in every respect.”

Suddenly, several of the humanoids became aware of the man and his wife sitting in their car observing the scene. One of the creatures pointed a tubular-shaped object at the couple that emitted a bright light. The next thing the pair remembered was being back on the highway many miles away and several hours later.

After experiencing this classic abduction scenario, the two began to have   disturbing dreams about their missing time, most of which they were reluctant to discuss with anyone. They sought psychological counseling but were assumed by mental health workers to have both had a psychotic break, for which medication was recommended. The abduction experience was little known in the mid-1970s, so this response from the mental health community is not surprising, Taff writes.

The man and his wife began to experience strong emotional mood swings, indicative of dramatically altered personalities. They eventually divorced, with the husband becoming particularly volatile and erratic, which led to his leaving his lucrative job in television in a newfound state of anxiety, anger and bitterness. What had begun as poltergeist activity had progressed to an alien UFO abduction and left great misery in its wake.

“We’re dealing with something far more advanced than we are,” Taff added during his lecture, “and technology that is like magic to us.”

But change is not the goal in physical science, he said, pointing to the fact that hardly anyone in mainstream science takes these issues seriously. There exists an inverse correlation between belief and whether new ideas will work, he said. What the scientists say won’t work will and what they say will work won’t. Imagine what would happen if a vehicle was unveiled tomorrow that used an entirely new form of energy. We need what Taff called “a change in the way we perceive normality.”

UFOs are the most classified information the government has, he continued. Add gray aliens to the mix of our own racial and ethnic problems, and one can imagine the results. We should not fear an alien invasion so much as the problems we’ve created for ourselves.

Both psychic phenomena and UFO contact involve an energy of a type we don’t understand, Taff said toward the end of his lecture. Most people are not sensitive to it and can live a long time without ever having any experiences with it. Others are sensitive to it.

“It’s there,” Taff said. “It’s real. We are always a (central) part of the equation.”

[Dr. Barry Taff is the author of the book “Aliens Above, Ghosts Below.” The website for CERO International is at www.cerointernational.com  Sean Casteel has a website at www.seancasteel.com]

Remote Viewing Into Deep Space: A Stellar Performance

 

NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft was launched into space in 1972. It was the the very first spacecraft to fly directly through the asteroid belt and make observations of the biggest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. It was also able to obtain close up images of the planet, something that scientists had never had access to before. (1)
Prior to the flyby of Jupiter by Pioneer 10, the CIA and NSA in conjunction with Stanford University were involved in what was called “Remote Viewing.”  Remote viewing can be defined in multiple ways. It’s the ability of individuals to describe a remote geographical location up to several hundred thousand kilometers away (sometimes even more) from their physical location.(2)(3)(4)
A gentlemen by the name of Ingo Swann was able to successfully describe and view a ring around Jupiter, a ring that scientists had no idea existed. This took place precisely before the first ever flyby of Jupiter by NASA’s Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which confirmed that the ring did actually exist. These results were published in advance of the rings’ discovery. (2)
The successful viewing of the ring by Ingo came after scientists observed him identify physical objects in hidden envelopes that were placed a few hundred kilometers away.
“Successful replication of this type of remote viewing in independent laboratories has yielded considerable scientific evidence for the reality of the [remote viewing] phenomenon. Adding to the strength of these results was the discovery that a growing number of individuals could be found to demonstrate high-quality remote viewing, often to their own surprise. The CIA even participated as remote viewers themselves in order to critique the protocols. CIA personnel generated successful target descriptions of sufficiently high quality to permit blind matching of descriptions to targets by independent judges.”(2) –Harold Puthoff, PhD, Stanford University
“To determine whether it was necessary to have a “beacon” individual at the target site, Swann suggested carrying out an experiment to remote view the planet Jupiter before the upcoming NASA Pioneer 10 flyby. In that case, much to his chagrin (and ours) he found a ring around Jupiter, and wondered if perhaps he had remote viewed Saturn by mistake. Our colleagues in astronomy were quite unimpressed as well, until the flyby revealed that an unanticipated ring did in fact exist.” (2) – Harold Puthoff, PhD, Stanford University
It’s remarkable to think about these extended human capacities, and what we are capable of. At the same time it’s sobering to think about how all of this information isn’t emphasized, and always kept classified and hidden from the human race. It makes you wonder what other information out there remains classified that we don’t know about yet, and what other truths the remote viewing program has uncovered.

The Above Information Was Documented. Here’s What Wasn’t.

Here is a quote from Ingo’s book Penetration, where he goes into detail about phenomenon that was not documented in the literature cited throughout this article.

“It’s one thing to read about UFOs and stuff in the papers or in books. It is another to hear rumors about the military or government having an interest in such matters, rumors which say they have captured extraterrestrials and downed alien space craft. But it’s quite another matter to find oneself in a situation which confirms everything. I found towers, machinery, lights buildings, humanoids busy at work on something I couldn’t figure out (on the back side of the moon)”
The information now available in the public domain regarding the government experiments with remote viewing were declassified in 1995, but who knows how much of the program’s information remains classified. Ingo had expressed that the program was shut down because it was one of the biggest threats to government secrecy.
It’s quite remarkable that this information was kept secret for over 20 years. Prior to 1995, the public had absolutely no idea that this type of thing was going on, it was a special access program, part of the black budget, which still today deals with projects and information the human race knows nothing about.
 “The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence.” – Nikola Tesla
Science has indeed studied non-physical phenomenon, for a very long time. Unfortunately, much of this science has been locked up within the classified world, and the remote viewing program (one of many) is a great example of that.
Source: Collective Evolution

Remote Viewing: The Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Media


CSL Home

CSL LogoCIA/AIR Report

The American Institutes for Research Review
of the Department of Defense’s
STAR GATE Program:
A Commentary

by

Edwin C. May, Ph.D.
Cognitive Sciences Laboratory
Palo Alto, California
(The Journal of Parapsychology. 60. 3-23. March 1996)

Abstract

As a result of a Congressionally Directed Activity, the Central Intelligence Agency conducted an evaluation of a 24-year, government-sponsored program to investigate ESP and its potential use within the Intelligence Community. The American Institutes for Research was contracted to conduct the review of both research and operations. Their 29 September 1995 final report was released to the public 28 November 1995.

As a result of AIR’s assessment, the CIA concluded that a statistically significant effect had been demonstrated in the laboratory, but that there was no case in which ESP had provided data that had ever been used to guide intelligence operations. This paper is a critical review of AIR’s methodology and conclusions. It will be shown that there is compelling evidence that the CIA set the outcome with regard to intelligence usage before the evaluation had begun.

This was accomplished by limiting the research and operations data sets to exclude positive findings, by purposefully not interviewing historically significant participants, by ignoring previous DOD extensive program reviews, and by using the questionable National Research Council’s investigation of parapsychology as the starting point for their review. While there may have been political and administrative justification for the CIA not to accept the government’s in-house program for the operational use of anomalous cognition, this appeared to drive the outcome of the evaluation.

As a result, they have come to the wrong conclusion with regard to the use of anomalous cognition in intelligence operations and significantly underestimated the robustness of the basic phenomenon.

Executive Summary

As part of the fiscal year 1995 defense appropriations bill, responsibility for the government-sponsored investigation and use of ESP* was transferred to the Central Intelligence Agency. In a Congressionally Directed Action, the CIA was instructed to conduct a retrospective review of the 24-year program, now known as STAR GATE, that resided primarily within the Intelligence Community. The analysis was to include the research that was conducted since 1972 at SRI International and later at Science Applications International Corporation.

In addition, the CIA was to include an assessment of the intelligence-gathering utility of anomalous cognition (AC), and the program history was to be declassified (CIA Public Affairs Office, 1995). Initiated in June 1995, the evaluation was to be completed by 30 September 1995.

The CIA contracted with the American Institutes for Research (AIR) to manage the review. They, in turn, formed a “blue-ribbon” panel that included psychologist Professor Ray Hyman from the University of Oregon and statistician Professor Jessica Utts from the University of California at Davis. AIR contributed Michael Mumford, Ph.D. and Andrew Rose, Ph.D. to the panel to provide unbiased assessment on methodological issues. The President of AIR, David Goslin, Ph.D., served as coordinator of the evaluation effort.

I was asked by CIA to provide administrative support, technical documents, and briefings on an as-needed basis for the review. This work was supported by a small contract to Science Applications International Corporation.

The CIA-sponsored AIR investigation concluded that a statistically significant laboratory effect has been demonstrated but more replications were needed. In no case had the anomalous cognition information ever been used to guide intelligence operations (Mumford, Rose, and Goslin, 1995).

I question the validity of their and the CIA’s conclusions because they:

  • Limited the data sets in the analysis. As a way of officially ignoring anomalous cognition’s positive contributions to intelligence, only a small fraction of the operational remote viewing database was examined. That was the final data collected just before the unit closed, a time widely known as problematic. In their laboratory evaluations, they restricted the investigation to only the government-sponsored research and then insisted on the need for more outside replications. In doing so, they ignored the conclusions of one of their own investigators who showed that the government-sponsored research had been already been conceptually replicated.
  • Failed to contact significant program participants. Because of the complexity of the 24-year program, it is impossible to conduct an in-depth and accurate evaluation without significant contact with the program’s many major participants. The review focused on the project’s reports, but they were written to satisfy specific contract requirements and were not designed individually or in total to serve as a program justification; thus, these documents provide a substantially incomplete picture of the program.

In addition to questioning the validity of CIA/AIR’s conclusions, I find such serious problems with their evaluation methodology that I have become reluctantly convinced that their conclusions were set before their investigation began. The investigators failed to:

  • Apply consistent criteria for acceptance or rejection of anomalous cognition. The investigators were troubled by possible non-AC alternative explanations for the statistically significant laboratory results, yet ignored similar alternatives for the failed operations. For example, well-known psychological effects such as bad morale, failed expectations, and a lack of a supportive environment, were not discussed as potential alternatives for the failed operations. In their positive forms, all of these psychological effects are critical for excellence in any human activity.
  • Avail themselves of the previous exhaustive reviews conducted by various organizations within the DOD, all but one of which was positive. Since the CIA was allowed only four months to complete the evaluation, it is surprising that they chose not to use this resource.
  • Reject a discredited evaluation of parapsychology conducted by the National Research Council (NRC). They knew that the NRC investigators were not cleared for access to the vast majority of SRI’s research, yet the AIR investigation relied heavily on the NRC’s review to question the SRI research results prior to 1988.
  • Use neutral government scientific evaluation resources such as the Military Services’ or the CIA’s Scientific Advisory Boards. Instead they commissioned external investigators with previously published conclusions about parapsychology. The CIA could then justify whatever conclusion they wished, because it would be consistent, by definition, with at least one of their external reviewers.
  • To recognize a potential significant conflict of interest for Dr. David Goslin, president of AIR and a report co-author. He had administrative responsibility for the discredited NRC investigation of parapsychology.

Finally, since the political situation and the status of the program had significantly deteriorated technically and administratively, I speculate that this contributed to the underlying reason why the CIA did not want the program even before the evaluation began.

In this paper, I will expand upon these topics to demonstrate clearly that the outcome and conclusions drawn by AIR and subsequently the CIA were set before the investigation began, and that methodological and administrative choices were made to assure that the results of the investigation would support the CIA’s pre-determined perspective. In addition, I will document that they have come to the wrong conclusion with regard to the use of anomalous cognition in intelligence operations and greatly underestimated the robustness of the phenomenon.

Critique of the CIA/AIR Conclusions

Limited Database for the Evaluation of Research and Operations

The program evaluation was set from the beginning to only include government-sponsored research. If the evaluation was confined to the assessment of the scientific quality of the research, then perhaps this is not a bad idea, given that the Congress was trying to determine whether there was merit to continue. Upon closer inspection, however, even in this case, limiting the scope of the evaluation to exclude replications is scientifically invalid. The evidence for or against a statistically-based phenomenon cannot rest on the evidence provided by a few investigators in two laboratories (i.e., SRI and SAIC). Rather, science demands that the evidence rest in replications. Yet, the reviewers were requested not to look outside the STAR GATE project.

In the CIA’s briefing to Congress, they list three points as attributed to the AIR investigation (May, 1995g) and I quote:

  • “the data do not establish that a paranormal phenomenon is involved, nature of source not identified”
  • “the data have not been replicated independently”
  • “the boundary constraints critical to obtaining statistically significant experimental results are not practical in real world of intelligence collection.”

No statistically based phenomena can be established without replication, yet the investigators were instructed not to look for any. (Utts, ignored this instruction and clearly showed that a conceptual replication has been well established in the literature and that significant statistical consistencies existed between the SRI and SAIC data sets.) Since the investigators were restricted at the outset, the top two bullets above are true by construction-not by analysis.

A casual scan of my collection of technical journals found four independent replications of remote viewing (Dunne and Bisaha, 1979; Schlitz and Gruber, 1980; Schlitz and Haight, 1984; and Targ et al., 1995). Rather than more replications as called for by AIR and Hyman, what is needed is a meta-analysis of all the AC studies to date and more attention on potential mechanisms.

Perhaps I should rest my case here. The CIA/AIR conclusions appeared to be designed into the investigation. Their final bullet above is questionable on its face value, because it is true by the nature of intelligence, not because of a valid criticism of the program’s operational AC. The only valid measure of intelligence utility for anomalous cognition is a top-level out-come measure, not a statistical analysis. In short, do end-users come back for more? Do any end-users have cases they can point to that helped solve an intelligence problem? The CIA and AIR say no, but as I will show below, that conclusion was also arrived ate by construction rather than by analysis.

I first learned of the CIA/AIR’s plan for the evaluation of the intelligence value of anomalous cognition from Mumford during the July meeting of the “blue-ribbon” panel at which I was invited to present material and answer questions. At that date, Mumford claimed that they were only going to look back three years from the end of the 24-year program. I told him that I was convinced that this would not provide an honest picture of the utility of AC. I informed the panel that I could easily predict the outcome based on my knowledge of the morale of the government’s viewers, the substandard management by Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) officials, the tasking (i.e., what data they were after) and the inappropriate collection protocols.

Mumford attempted to justify his decision by saying he did not want to rely on memory and hearsay. He would not have to, because there was an extensive written history including testimonials to official organizations within the Intelligence Community. Mumford reiterated that he was sticking to his plan, regardless.

I objected to this decision to ignore existing data. I called the individual at CIA who had been assigned to manage the review, hereafter called the Point of Contact or POC, and insisted that some of the officials I had previously named had to be contacted. I learned later that the names and phone numbers of at least six individuals had been given to the POC. These end-users were both on active duty and retired who have already been on written record as attesting to the value of AC-derived intelligence data in solving specific problems.

After the AIR report had been given to Congress, but before it was released to the public and before I had seen it, I called many of the individuals on the list. Most were not contacted and those that were, told the CIA representative the case specifics and value of their individual circumstances. Some of the positive findings occurred before the final year but within the last three years of the project.

Finally, even a cursory investigation of the written record of intelligence operations would have revealed substantial evidence of the operational utility of anomalous cognition. Minimally, there exists enough data to claim prima facie utility with regard to the method, and selected cases are beyond doubt as to AC’s specific utility.

Joseph McMoneagle, one of the original government viewers beginning in 1978 and a consultant to the SRI/SAIC and Cognitive Sciences Laboratory, in 1984 was granted a Legion of Merit award for excellence in intelligence service. The Legion of Merit is rarely awarded for other than 20 or 30 years service, yet McMoneagle received his on the following basis. I quote, with permission, from McMoneagle’s citation:

“…He [McMoneagle] served most recently as a Special Project Intelligence Officer for SSPD, SSD, and 902d MI Group, as one of the original planners and movers of a unique intelligence project that is revolutionizing the intelligence community. While with SSPD, he used his talents and expertise in the execution of more than 200 missions, addressing over 150 essential elements of information [EEI]. These EEI contained critical intelligence reported at the highest echelons of our military and government, including such national level agencies as the Joint Chiefs of Staff, DIA, NSA, CIA, DEA, and the Secret Service, producing crucial and vital intelligence unavailable from any other source…”

How is it that the CIA and AIR could not find compelling evidence for the operational utility of anomalous cognition? They clearly chose not to look.

Important Program Participants: Never Contacted

From 1985 through 1990, the research project at SRI International enjoyed substantial, on-going, and written scientific oversight of the major portion of the AC database at SRI. Twelve individuals, who are world-renowned in their individual disciplines, were chosen by the client and other government officials to serve on our Scientific Oversight Committee. In addition, they were selected on the basis of the scientific reputations and on the basis of their skepticism. “Believers” were not allowed on the committee. The SOC’s responsibilities were four-fold:

  • Evaluate our written protocols prior to conducting any experiments. The protocol that was actually used for each investigation was the convergence of round-robin exchange with the SOC.
  • Exercise un-announced drop-in privileges to observe experiments in progress. Approximately one half of the SOC availed themselves of this opportunity.
  • Review the then classified final research reports as if they were technical journal submissions in their individual disciplines. The disciplines included physics, philosophy, psychology, electrical engineering, statistics, and astronomy. Their reviews were in writing and appended, un-edited, to our each final report.
  • Suggest approaches for research in the next year of the 5-year contract.

During the SAIC time, the SOC was limited to only five members but they had the same charter. Three of the five came from the SOC at SRI. At SAIC we established two additional oversight committees. An Institutional Review Board (i.e., human use committee) was established with nine members who were health and medical professionals and are renowned in their disciplines as well.

The list included one Nobel laureate as did SAIC’s Scientific Oversight Committee. Besides assuring the protection of our human subjects, they also served as a less formal scientific oversight committee.

The third oversight committee at SAIC was for policy. The three members of this committee came from formerly very senior positions in the DOD and their job was to assure that we were meeting our obligations to the DOD and supporting its mission.

Of these 17 individuals who had intimate knowledge of the inner workings of this project, scientifically, methodologically, and administratively only one was contacted by CIA. It was that single individual who provided the names of satisfied end-users I discussed above.

The SOC’s comments were available to the AIR reviewers in written form, and many of the committee members lived on the east coast and even a few lived in Washington. The CIA/AIR investigators could have easily contacted them. They didn’t.

The failure to contact significant program participants does not end with these committees. I provided the POC with the names and phone numbers of numerous other pertinent individuals. The list included the previous project director for STAR GATE who had retired less than a year before the review and the Commander for a still-classified client who initiated a single contract that accounted for a significant fraction of all the funding for the project over the 24 years.

In addition, I gave the POC the names of a number of the original government viewers. In short, with interviews of mostly local people the CIA could have gained significant insight to the scientific, operational, managerial, and political aspects of the STAR GATE project. They chose to ignore these resources.

Methodological Problems

Inconsistent Criteria

One of AIR’s significant methodological flaws is important with regard to the assessment of operations. In the Section on the Evaluation Plan in the report, Mumford et al. (Page 2-1, 1995) correctly required of the laboratory investigations “…unambiguous [emphasis added] evidence for the existence of the phenomenon… .” Following this lead, Hyman hypothesized a number of alternative explanations for the observed statistical significance other than the anomalous cognitive one, although he admits he couldn’t find any obvious flaws in the methodology (Mumford et al., 1995, Page 3-75).

For example, he is troubled that during the SAIC research, a single judge was used to conduct all the laboratory evaluations. Although Hyman does not propose how this might effect the result, he is correct in proposing the hypothesis that it might somehow affect the outcome. (Hyman lists other alternatives as well, but this one illustrates the point.) As it turns out, Utts finds statistical homogeneity (i.e., meaningful consistency) among the results from SRI, SAIC, and replications elsewhere when that single judge was not involved. Thus, this hypothesis must be rejected. This same consistency also rejects the other alternatives Hyman proposes, as well.

Yet, AIR fails to apply the same “unambiguous” criteria to their evaluation of the efficacy of AC in intelligence operations. In this case, why operations may have failed. In particular, in their discussion in the Section on Evaluating the Utility of Remote Viewing in Intelligence Operations they list a number of “boundary conditions” that might affect anomalous cognition in operations. These include a number of physical and methodological issues such as feedback and whether a sender or distance to the target might be factors.

They did not discuss or propose any psychological issues that may have been the deciding factors as to why the operations failed in their limited sample. For example, it is well-known that human performance of any kind and most certainly AC-performance is profoundly affected by the morale, the expectations of the participants, and the emotional environment in which the performance is expected (e.g., home-team effect in sports). But none of these potentially critical factors was discussed in the context of reaching the unambiguous conclusion that AC was useless in operations.

I had discussed these points in my meeting with the blue-ribbon panel in July, 1995. In particular, having spent considerable time with the government remote viewing unit, I was knowledgeable about what psychologists call “set and setting.”

That is, I saw first hand and reported to the panel that during the last two years (i.e., the time of the operational evaluation) the emotional environment had deteriorated to the point that the viewers wanted to leave the unit, and some of the staff had already left in disgust (May, 1995i). The morale was so low that doing excellent remote viewing, or practically anything else, would be out of the question. The AIR investigators interviewed the government remote viewers (Mumford et al., 1995, Page 4-9) and learned of these problems, first hand (May, 1995j).

These critically important factors were completely left out of the discussion in the report and no alternate hypotheses were suggested to question their “unambiguously negative conclusion about the use of AC in intelligence operations.

Previous Program Reviews

Even before I was officially under contract with CIA, I gave the POC either copies of, or pointers to, a number of classified program reviews that had been conducted in the past.*

One important aspect of the program was its on-going and rigorous review and technical oversight. Everyone involved (i.e., the government sponsors, SRI, and SAIC) were correctly concerned that the research should be as rigorous as possible and that the program could be justified within the Intelligence Community and DOD. These reviews were extensive and were conducted by General military officers, senior members of the Intelligence Community, respected scientists from many disciplines, and end-users of the AC intelligence product.

These remain classified, and with one exception, were positive with regard to the existence of AC and its successful contributions to intelligence. Even the negative one only wanted to stop the research but continue the operations! The final such review was conducted in 1987.

In addition to the written reviews, from 1985 through 1990 the program enjoyed the continued oversight of a high-ranking military officer from the still-classified sponsor and a GS-15 geneticist from DIA as permanent on-site observers at SRI.

The POC is a Ph.D. scientist and at the time seemed dedicated to the best job possible. He informed me, however, that the CIA intended to ignore the previous reviews and start fresh. Given that the review had to be in Congress in four months, I could not conceive how it could be effective and accurate and ignore the substantial amount of previous oversight. After all, a complete analysis could, and should have, included a review of the previous classified DOD assessments.

A Thread of Bias, Potential Conflict of Interest, and Suppression of Data.

In the early days of the project, Targ and Puthoff (1974a) reported on a series of experiments they conducted at SRI with Mr. Uri Geller, an Israeli magician/psychic. George Lawrence from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) accompanied by two consultants, Ray Hyman and Robert Van de Castle, came to SRI requesting an opportunity to see an experiment in progress with Geller. Puthoff and Targ correctly denied access to the ARPA representatives because of technical and administrative protocol issues.

After all, with such controversy swirling about Geller, it is easy to become quite paranoid about who is trying to trick whom. The safest and the most scientifically sound course is not to allow anyone except the direct research team to witness formal experiments regardless of credentials (Targ and Puthoff, 1977 and May, 1996).

Yet, as part of their cover story, Time magazine (Jaroff, 1974) quoted Ray Hyman’s claim that the SRI tests were carried out with “incredible sloppiness.” The irony is that the tests that Hyman and Lawrence witnessed at SRI were indeed conducted with “incredible sloppiness,” but the experiments they witnessed were of their own making and had nothing at all to do with protocols of those experiments to which they had been denied access (Targ and Puthoff, 1974b and May, 1996).

It is clear that Lawrence and Hyman had strongly held positions and were willing to report their experiences at SRI inaccurately. Thus we see the first evidence of a negative bias on the part of Lawrence and Hyman.

In 1984, their biases were again demonstrated. The Army Research Institute (ARI) commissioned the American Academy of Sciences to investigate the potential of certain techniques that propose to enhance human performance (Druckman and Swets, 1988).

Although performance enhancement has never been the claim of research parapsychology, the National Research Council included parapsychology as one of the topics to be studied.

The same George Lawrence formerly from ARPA was ARI’s project monitor, and he asked that Ray Hyman be commissioned to head the investigation into parapsychological phenomena. David Goslin, Executive Director of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education for the National Research Council, served as overall project director and agreed to the request.

On parapsychology, the NRC study concluded (Druckman and Swets, 1988):

“The committee finds no scientific justification from research conducted over a period of 130 years for the existence of parapsychological phenomena. It therefore concluded that there is no reason for direct involvement by the Army at this time.

We do recommend, however, that research in certain areas be monitored, including work by the Soviets and the best work in the United States. The latter include that being done at Princeton University by Robert Jahn; at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn by Charles Honorton, now in Princeton; at San Antonio by Helmut Schmidt; and at the Stanford Research Institute by Edward (sic) May. Monitoring could be enhanced by site visits and by expert advice from both proponents and skeptics. The research areas included would be psychokinesis with random even generators and Ganzfeld effects.”

By the time the NRC began their investigation, I was the project director at SRI International. Our program was highly classified at that time and special access was required before any aspect of the project could be discussed even with individuals with appropriate security clearences.* Thus, neither the in-house DIA classified program nor the NRC investigators, and particular Ray Hyman, had access to over 80% of all the remote viewings conducted during the SRI years.

None of the research reports from this contract were kept with the DIA remote viewing group. So even though Hyman had access to the this group, he was denied access to and probably even unaware of the SRI data of that time period.

I was not even allowed to meet with Hyman in our laboratory or office space; he and I met in a separate building at SRI that was not associated with project. Our discussions were confined to our published account of a careful random number generator experiment that we had conducted in 1979.

In the overall summary shown above, remote viewing was not even mentioned although an analysis of the early studies at SRI and later studies at Princeton are contained in the body of the NRC report. With regard to their conclusion on remote viewing: “…the literature on remote viewing has managed to produce only one possibly successful experiment that is not seriously flawed in its methodology-and that one experiment provides only marginal evidence for the existence of ESP.”

The parapsychology section of the NRC study was a mockery of good science and serves as an excellent model for a pseudo-scientific investigation. The methodology for the NRC investigation and their conclusions were soundly criticized and shown to be without scientific merit (Palmer, Honorton, and Utts, 1989). The four major points drawn by Palmer et al. are summarized:

  • “The NRC claimed they could find no evidence for parapsychological phenomena during the last 130 years, yet they examined only 10% of the systematic scientific effort in parapsychology.”
  • “The two principal evaluators of parapsychological research, Ray Hyman and James Alcock, were publicly committed to a negative position on parapsychology at the time the NRC research Committee was formed. [Note added by May: In addition, the phrase “..the total accumulation of 130 year’s worth of psychical investigations has not produced any consistent evidence for parnormality…” can be found in Hyman (1986) and the NRC conclusion (1988), and thus demonstrates his stated bias before the NRC investigation was complete.]”
  • “The Committee’s method of assessing parapsychology violates its own stated guidelines for research evaluation, which specify the identification and assessment of plausible alternatives. With regard to the better parapsychological experiments, the Committee admits, “We do not have a smoking gun, nor have we demonstrated a plausible alternative” (Druckman and Swets, 1988, p. 200).”
  • “The report selectively omits important findings favorable to parapsychology contained in one of the background papers commissioned for the Committee, while liberally citing from other papers supportive of the Committee’s [negative] position. The principal author of the favorable paper, an eminent Harvard psychologist, was actually asked by the Chair of the NRC Committee to withdraw his favorable conclusions.”

This last point is particularly troublesome and reveals the political nature of what should have been a carefully conducted scholarly investigation that usually characterizes the National Research Council. Violating one of the basic tenets of science to report all findings, the NRC Committee asked Professor Robert Rosenthal to:

“…omit the section of our paper evaluating the Ganzfeld research domains. I refused to do so but was so shocked and disappointed by this request that I discussed this request with a number of colleagues in the Harvard departments of Psychology and of Statistics. Without exception they were as shocked as I was.

In the end, censorship did not occur, and Monica Harris’ and my paper is available in its entirety in a kind of preprint format from the National Academy Press.*

Rosenthal’s and Harris’ commissioned paper listed the Ganzfeld methodological quality to be superior to the typical quality of the other four areas they considered (Rosenthal, 1990).

In addition to the significant methodological flaws and the attempt to suppress positive findings, the NRC study was essentially contradicted in it’s major conclusion by a one-day workshop hosted by the Office of Technology Assessment, the research arm of the US Congress (Office of Technology Assessment, 1989). The OTA did not completely exonerate the field of research parapsychology; there is no scientific endeavor that cannot be improved. The OTA did, however, clearly demonstrate that the research cannot simply be dismissed-a view directly opposite to the NRC’s conclusion.

In continuing the development of a potential conflict of interest, I point out once again that David Goslin had administrative responsibility for this seriously flawed NRC investigation.

When the CIA was searching for someone to conduct their technical review of the STAR GATE program, they were turned down by the National Research Council in part because of the time constraint and in part because of the substantial negative publicity that resulted from their previous report on parapsychology (May, 1995e). Instead, AIR was commissioned to conduct the review. AIR’s president is David Goslin.

Let me now summarize the thread of bias and potential conflict of interest. Ray Hyman and George Lawrence were denied access to SRI experiments with Uri Geller in 1974. Ray Hyman has a long history of a negative bias with regard to parapsychology. In 1985, George Lawrence commissioned the National Academy of Sciences to investigate parapsychology and picked Hyman to direct the effort. In 1986, David Goslin presided over a methodologically flawed review. In 1995, David Goslin assumed responsibility for the CIA-sponsored investigation of the STAR GATE program.

It is not a surprising that the NRC study is liberally quoted in the AIR report because it supports the possibly predisposed views of CIA/AIR, albeit from a flawed investigation. Since Professor Jessica Utts was one of the co-authors of the formal response to the NRC study, I questioned her (May, 1995f):

“Since you were a contributing author to the reply [to the NRC investigation] and since the reply soundly criticized the NRC’s review methodology, I was surprised to see that you did not mention the NRC study or the PA’s [Parapsychological Association] reply in your section of the AIR’s report. Considering the weight that the AIR investigators placed on the NRC study, I feel it was a substantial oversight for you not have added your first-hand criticism of the NRC report as part of your remarks.”

So that I make no errors in interpretation, I print, with permission, her complete reply (19 December 1995):

“This is in response to your question about why I did not mention the National Research Council’s 1988 evaluation of parapsychology in my report to AIR. The answer is that I was explicitly asked by AIR staff NOT to mention the NRC report in my review! This is very troubling to me for a number of reasons.

First, you are correct in stating that I was aware that the NRC committee was not shown much of the relevant remote viewing data when they did their review, and that they did not in fact even know the data existed. As you also noted, I co-authored a critical review of the NRC report shortly after it was published, illustrating a number of weaknesses with it.

What you may not know is that in addition to those problems, the statistical method the NRC committee relied on for its findings (called “vote-counting”) has been completely discredited, and is known to produce misleading results. I raised this point at the July meeting Ray Hyman and I attended with the AIR staff at their Palo Alto office, and it was substantiated by Stanford Statistics Professor Lincoln Moses, who had been asked by the AIR staff to attend the meeting to comment on that and related statistical issues. (Had the NRC committee included a statistician, that serious flaw, and the subsequent misleading results, may have been avoided. I am sorry to say that even at our meeting in Palo Alto, Ray did not seem to understand the problem, and he was the principal “statistician” for the NRC report.)

When I was explicitly asked by AIR staff NOT to mention the NRC report in my review, I assumed they had realized the problems with it, and, especially given the involvement of the AIR President with the NRC Committee, were happy to let it fade into oblivion.

Given that background, I was quite disappointed to see that AIR made liberal use of the NRC report in their conclusions. Had I known they were going to do that, I certainly would have discussed the multiple problems with it in my report. By not mentioning it, an uninformed reader may assume that I support it, which I certainly do not.

I would also like to explain another omission in my report that occurred for much the same reason. Despite the claims Ray Hyman is making in the media, we were shown very little of the “operational” remote viewing work. One of the few documents we were shown was a list of “[the former DIA project officer’s] best” remote viewing successes.

Since the list provided almost no detail, you may recall that I asked you for names and numbers of individuals I could contact to get more information about those purported operational successes. In a memo dated August 1, 1995, you provided me with phone numbers for [ a former DIA project officer, a former senior DIA official, a military General who had program responsibility], and Joseph McMoneagle. You sent a copy of the memo to the AIR staff.

Shortly after you sent me that memo, I was contacted by the AIR staff and told that I was NOT to contact any of those individuals. Thus, I was not able to gain any details about the operational remote viewing work. I thought you should know that, in case you were wondering why I requested that information and then did not use it.

Again, I am clueless as to why Ray Hyman is making claims in the media that we had access to the operational work for our review. I do not think he was given access to any information not shown to me. I don’t know how he can substantiate the claims he’s making about remote viewing being useless for intelligence. He may be correct, but he has very little data on which to base that conclusion.”

While a case can be made that Professor Utts should not be contacting people with regard to operations because she did not possess a clearance at the time, the individuals I named are professionals and would not disclose classified information to an uncleared person. Regardless, the AIR investigators cannot be excused from the attempt to suppress intellectual findings by, or to limit the research of, a noted academic that may be germane to the stated goals of the investigation.

The NRC study was discredited in print and I had discussed that issues in detail with AIR’s blue ribbon panel.

Biased Investigators on the AIR’s “Blue-Ribbon” Panel

Since our research program had been reviewed by various Science Advisory Boards including DIA’s, it seemed prudent and natural that the CIA should ask their own Board or one of many that reside in the Washington area to conduct the program’s technical evaluation. I even provided names and phone numbers of individuals who I know on various boards to expedite the contact.

Instead, Utts and Hyman were chosen to act as the expert reviewers. At first glance, this seems like a reasonable approach given that no learning curve would be required. I told the POC that I thought this was not a good plan and that I could easily predict their conclusions based on their previous writing. See Hyman (1986) and Utts (1991) as samples. I reiterated that an in-place Science Advisory Board would better serve that evaluation.

What better way to conclude whatever you wish than to build into the evaluation protocol a priori stated scholarly views that are known to span the opinion space. This guarantees that the concluding remarks by CIA will, by definition, be consistent with some evaluator on the team. That is exactly what happened. In the CIA’s presentation to Congress, eight separate bulleted points are allotted to Hyman’s conclusion while only four are allotted to Utts’ and none are given to Utts’ important rebuttal to Hyman (May, 1995g).

Good Advice Ignored

Since most of the work under review occurred under my watch as the contractor program director, I could obviously not be involved in the analysis directly, but as part of my contract responsibility, I was asked to advise the review process. In a 4-page document (May, 1995a), I indicated in words and figures how a review might proceed. The major point was that acceptance criteria for operations and research should be set prior to the review so that they could be used to judge the validity of the program in an unbiased way.

(Arguably, one could say that I had a vested interest in the outcome and my views should be ignored; however, I only provided suggestions from a top-down perspective and did not suggest any details that could be considered self-serving. It was beneficial to the program and to me personally to have the most honest and rigorous review possible, and I was completely confident that such a review could only be positive.)

The criteria for the research could easily be adopted from the established and accepted scientific rules for evidence. Quoting from my memorandum (May, 1995a):

“The existence of anomalous mental phenomena cannot be statistically determined from the results of a single laboratory. The requirements for replication of a statistical phenomenon and the methods for the analysis of cross-laboratory results are well developed.”

Not only was this advice ignored, it was ignored by fiat. The reviewers were instructed to only look at research results from SRI and SAIC. Fortunately for scientific credibility, Professor Utts ignored this statistically invalid directive. Such action by CIA with regard to their review can only add to the evidence that they were either only interested in a negative outcome or statistically naive.

Determining the efficacy of operations was much more difficult. Would one successful operation be sufficient justification to continue the program, or would all the operations have to be useful? What constitutes a successful operation? A one percent hit rate might be considered miraculous by one customer, but a 50% hit rate might be useless to another. I made no attempt to suggest what that judgment criteria should be; I only urged that it be set in advance. It wasn’t.

It was not done as a matter of official policy or even informally as a guideline. As it turned out, the POC later informed me that only a single case would be sufficient as far as he was concerned, but he was careful to say that the decision was being made at “a much higher pay grade then his.” I learned later that they were only going to examine the last set of AC operations from the 24-year program. I and they knew that these cases were not representative of the program at large. This point will be expanded below.

Early in the review, I was request to provide a list of my 10-best examples of research that supported the existence of anomalous cognition. In a memorandum (May, 1995b), I complained about that request. In part, I quote:

“Since the complete document set will be available to AIR, I recommend the following approach:

  • For the period at SRI from 1973 to 1989 (this also covers the pre NRC report date) use the [in-house] meta-analysis as a guideline for the assessment with spot checks to the primary documents to validate the SRI evaluation.
  • Use all the work conducted under the SAIC program from 1991 through 1994 as the simplified test set of documents. I think that includes 4 final reports and perhaps 10 major projects within that set.
  • Conduct the final evaluation from both sources of data. (One thing that could be done is to use the results of the meta-analysis of the SRI data to predict what might happen during the SAIC research. The meta-analysis could be predictive only if there were a genuine phenomenon. In my view, this would add to the overall analysis.)

This approach avoids the file draw problem [i.e., not publishing studies that fail to meet statistical significance] altogether and includes most of the documents I would count as my 10 anyway. I can only think of a few other studies that I might want to include and all of them have been accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.”

I responded in part again to the same request (May, 1995c):

Although the request seems straight forward at the outset, to establish the existence of Remote Viewing on the basis of a subset of the total data set does not conform to the accepted practice for meta-analysis as set forth in Rosenthal (1991) and Hedges and Olkin (1985).

I went on to comply to the request in such a way that the complete record would be examined to avoid any accusation of a so-called “file-drawer” problem by including in my list a detailed in-house meta-analysis covering the period from 1973 to 1989 (May, Utts, Trask, Luke, Frivold, and Humphrey, 1989). This analysis was conducted as part of contractual requirement to a still-classified sponsor.

AIR ignored the CIA directive by including the National Research Council’s review of parapsychology as a support for their conclusions about research. Knowing full well that the NRC investigators did not have access to any SRI reports from 1985 onward (May, 1995d), they featured it prominently in their final report.

Little Contact with the Program’s Principal Investigator

I would like to emphasize my role, or lack of it, in the CIA/AIR evaluation of the STAR GATE program. As I said before, it was inappropriate for me to be involved in the actual assessment; however, it is especially important to learn from the critical details that never make it into official reports. To illustrate my point, of all the “blue-ribbon” panelists, Professor Utts was the most familiar with the project; she had served as a visiting scientist for a year during the SRI era. Even with her intimate knowledge she called me at least 12 times to seek clarification on specific points in the documents she was reading. Professor Hyman never called and the AIR team not only did not call but refused to return my multi-faceted communication attempts. As a result of AIR negligence, their report contains numerous errors of fact and errors of assumptions.

I was the director of the government-sponsored investigation of anomalous mental phenomena for 10 of the 24-year history. I presided over 70% of the total contractor budget, 85% of the program’s data collection, and had intimate knowledge of and responsibility for the project. For AIR to not use this resource is scientifically indefensible.

As the review process was coming to an end, I formally sought the opportunity to provide a written commentary to the AIR report to be included with the blue-ribbon panel’s reports (May, 1995h). Given that Utts and Hyman were given space to comment on each others work,* and since most of the science that was being reviewed was work conducted under my direction, it seemed only natural to include my comments. That request and a similar one to AIR was ignored.

Political Reason Why CIA may not have Wanted the Program

Under the reluctant auspices of the DIA, the program transitioned from SRI to Science Applications International Corporation in 1991. We recognized shortly thereafter that DIA did not welcome the responsibility as the contracting agency. The reason DIA management was not anxious to have the program was complex and not associated with the technical aspects. Some of the DIA management had previous negative experiences with senior military officers who had become “believers,” oversold the program’s capability, and were known as “loose cannons” in the community.

This reluctance manifested in two important ways. First of all, the initial financial support for the program in 1991 came directly as part of the supplemental Defense Appropriations bill and was considered by Congress as “seed” money. DIA was expected to request follow-on support as part of the overall DIA annual budget requests. Those requests never happened; all program support through 1995 came from the Appropriations bills.

One consequence was, that a member of the staff of the Senate Appropriations Committee became increasingly disappointed with the DIA and began to micro-manage the program with disastrous results. A second consequence was that an attempt was made in 1993 to transfer the program to CIA. No willing recipient could be found there to accept the program. Even then the CIA did not want program responsibility.

Secondly, the negative attitude from senior DIA management filtered down the chain of command. For example, the final project officer who had direct responsibility for the program before it closed had little knowledge of the program; no knowledge of its substantial history; no technical background to manage such a project; ignored the research results; and created a crushing atmosphere with his management style. The morale was so bad that viewers and officials within the government’s remote viewing unit repeatedly asked me to intervene. This placed me in a very difficult position as a contractor. I informed middle management at DIA of the problems with no result.

In short, the program was in shambles. The operations that were conducted during the last few years of the project, for the most part, were destined to and did fail. It was this program, including personnel, that was to be transferred to CIA by 1 July 1995. In my professional opinion, which I shared with the POC, the program, as it was configured, would not produce successful AC intelligence operations.

So, CIA had strong and valid reasons not to want the program. The Agency was soundly criticized in the press for mishandling the Ames case and other excesses, so they did not need another controversy. In my opinion, the last thing they would want would be to inherit a Congressionally micro-managed program in severe internal distress no matter what its content or potential might be. Yet, by law they had to comply with the Congressional Directed Action and conduct the review. No wonder that it was probably done in such a way to assure a negative outcome with regard to operations.

Conclusions

It is impossible for me to prove whether or not the CIA determined the outcome of the investigation before it began. What is obvious, however, is that the evaluation domain of the research and particularly the operations were restricted to preclude positive findings.

The CIA did not contact or ignored people who possessed critical knowledge of the program, including some end-users of the intelligence data. Investigators were chosen who either had previously published conclusions or who possessed a serious potential for a conflict of interest. With the exception of the significantly flawed National Research Council’s review, all the DOD previous evaluations of the research and intelligence applications were ignored.

I am forced to conclude that either the AIR investigators were not competent to conduct a proper review of such a complex program-a view to which I do not subscribe-or they knew exactly what they were doing; they wanted to demonstrate a lack of intelligence utility for anomalous cognition. They did so by construction rather than by careful analysis.

Let us grant for the moment that my supposition is true; the CIA wanted to kill the program. Why was such a detailed rebuttal necessary? After all, an agency should be able to express their wishes with regard to the acceptance of any program that the Congress might assign.

In fact, I see it as part of the various agency’s responsibility to inform Congress of what might, or might not, be possible. Rejecting the STAR GATE program on the basis of an incomplete and incorrect analysis not only creates a false legacy, it does not easily allow for other organizations in the public or private sector to assume responsibility for a new version of the program.

Aside from setting the record straight, I felt obligated to show that as the result of their flawed methodology, the CIA/AIR greatly underestimated the statistical robustness of the research results and significantly undervalued the potential for anomalous cognition in intelligence operations.

References

Druckman, D. and Swets, J A. Ed. (1988). Enhancing Human Performance. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. 167-208.

Dunne, B. J. and Bisaha, J. P. (1979). Precognitive Remote Viewing in the Chicago Area: A replication of the Stanford Experiment. Journal of Parapsychology. 43, No. 1. 1-16.

Hedges, L. V. and Olkin, I. (1985). Statistical Methods for Meta-Analysis. Academic Press, Inc. Harcourt Brace Javanovich. New York, NY.

Hyman, R. (1986). Parapsychological Research: A Tutorial Review and Critical Appraisal. Invited Paper. Proceedings of the IEEE. 74, No. 6. p. 825.

Jaroff, L. (1974). Boom Times on the Psychic Frontier. Time Magazine. 4 March. 56-72.

May, E. C., Utts, J. M., Trask, V. V, Luke, W. L. W., Frivold, T. J, and Humphrey, B. S. (1989). Review of the Psychoenergetic Research Conducted at SRI International (1973-1988). Final Report-Task 6.0.1, Project 1291. SRI International, Menlo Park, CA.

May, E. C. (1995a). Memorandum to POC. 6 June 1995.

May, E. C. (1995b). Memorandum to POC. 14 June 1995.

May, E. C. (1995c). Memorandum to POC. 19 June 1995.

May, E. C. (1995d). In May’s only meeting with the AIR “blue-ribbon” panel during which the lack of NRC access was discussed in detail. July 1995.

May, E. C. (1995e) Personal communication. The CIA point of contact.

May, E. C. (1995f). E-mail letter to Professor Utts, 17 December.

May, E. C. (1995g). Personal communication. US Senate Appropriations Committee Staff Member.

May, E. C. (1995h). Memorandum to POC. 14 August 1995.

May, E. C. (1995i). Personal communication. Foreign analyst for the unit, June, 1995.

May, E. C. (1995,j). Personal communication. A government remote viewer, August 1995.

May, E. C. (1996). Personal communication. Hal Puthoff.

Mumford, M. D., Rose, A. M., and Goslin, D. A. (1995). An Evaluation of Remote Viewing: Research and Applications. The American Institutes for Research report. September 29.

Office of Technology Assessment (1989). Report of a Workshop on Experimental Parapsychology. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research. 83, No. 4. 317-340.

Palmer, J. A., Honorton, C. and Utts, J. (1989). Reply to the National Research Council Study on Parapsychology. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research.. 83, No 1. 31-50.

Public Affairs Office, Central Intelligence Agency, 6 September 1995.

Rosenthal, R. (1990). Letter to the Editor. Psychological Science.. 1, No. 5. p.329.

Rosenthal, R. (1991). Meta-Analysis Procedures for Social Research.. Sage Publications, London, UK.

Schlitz, M. J. and Gruber, E. (1980). Transcontinental Remote Viewing. Journal of Parapsychology. 44, No. 4. 305-318.

Schlitz, M. J. and Haight. J. (1984). Remote Viewing Revisited: An Intrasubject Replication. Journal of Parapsychology. 48, No. 1. 39-50.

Targ, R. and Puthoff. H. E. (1974a). Information Transmission Under Conditions of Sensory Shielding. Nature. 252. 602-607.

Targ, R. and Puthoff, H. E. (1974b). Geller: experimenters reply. New Scientist. Letters. 7 November.

Targ, R. and Puthoff, H. E. (1977). Mind-Reach. Delacorte Press.

Targ, R, Katra, J, Brown, D., and Wiegand, W. (1995). Viewing the Future: A Pilot Study with an Error-Detecting Protocol. Journal of Scientific Exploration. 9, No. 3. 367-380.

Utts, J. (1991). Replication and Meta-Analysis in Parapsychology. Statistical Science. 6, No. 4. 363-403.

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A Different Kind Of Psychic: Being A Medical Intuitive

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In human culture, when people are unique in some way; very talented, attractive, very famous, very rich and/or successful, people react to them rather differently than they do to normal people.  This quality of humanity is what makes celebrities out of singers, actors, directors, artists, athletes, etc.  Some writers are even looked upon as celebrities by those who really admire their work and follow it.

However, if what makes you unique is outside the boundaries of what makes other people unique as stated above, people may not beat a path to your door or listen to what you have to say.  In point of fact, they may run away in sheer terror.   At first, some might find you interesting, distinctive, intriguing, fascinating and appealing, until reality sets in, and then they run for the hills. (See end of article for something even stranger)

What would you do if you awoke tomorrow morning and suddenly had a super power that none of your friends or family possessed?  No, you cannot fly, nor are you invulnerable and do not possess super strength.  This super power is far subtler in nature.

Would you tell your family and friends about it?  Would you demonstrate it to them?  Would you risk being called weird or crazy?  And what if you eventually disclosed and demonstrated your ability to those around you and they literally ran away out of fear that you were either psychotic or inhuman?  Then what?  Well, as weird as this all sounds, I’ve actually lived with this exact problem ever since I was a very young child.

How many of you saw the Man of Steel movie last summer?  How many of you remember the scenes where young Clark Kent suddenly develops his X-ray vision while at school?

Well, I identified quite strongly with those scenes in Man of Steel, for I really did develop a rudimentary form of X-ray vision when I was very young, almost identical to the way it was depicted on-screen in the film, except I didn’t run off to hide in a closet and it was in full color as opposed to blue/sepia-tinted.  But it definitely has served to get me into trouble every so often.  In fact, there was a fascinating TV commercial for AXE “Bullet” men’s body spray that aired back in 2008 which featured a young man who was able to spontaneously peer through the outer clothing garments of women with ease.  Wow, did that bring back memories, as well as reminding me of some incredibly cool, electronic, instrumental music from The Seeds (Can’t Seem To Make You Mine) dating back to 1966.

I remember how it all started for me back at around eight or nine years old, where I’d suddenly be looking at someone and could literally see inside their body as if it were made of glass.  Thinking it was really interesting; I never really did anything to verify what it was I was seeing.   But that all changed a year or so later.

In the 5th grade at the age of ten, there were sporadic, but tantalizing episodes where it appeared that I could voluntarily look into and through people’s bodies, like a 3-D color X-ray.  I was way too cautious to ask anyone what it was I was actually seeing, so I naturally assumed that everyone could do what I could.  But that all came to a head in short order.

It was during recess in elementary school while playing some silly game in the courtyard that a blond, blue-eyed girl named Christine started walking towards me.  While looking in her direction my vision somewhat blurred for an instant and suddenly I could clearly see that beneath Christine’s sky blue dress was a large plastic bag attached to her side with a plastic tube running into her body.  What was I seeing?  I’d never seen anything like that before?

Naturally, I walked over to Christine to ask her what the bag and tube under her dress were for.  Christine turned beet red and began screaming, while she ran back into the school building to find our teacher.   It turned out that Christine had a colostomy and the bag and its tube were there for that reason.  But as a ten-year-old kid, who knew nothing about medicine, how could I understand what this was?

I was immediately dragged into the principal’s office in order to be chastised for either sneaking into the girl’s bathroom or somehow peering under Christine’s dress.   When I informed the principal that my X-ray vision suddenly turned itself on, he looked at like I was totally out of my mind.  He sternly warned me that my actions could get me suspended or even expelled from the school and put in jail.

As I was looking at the principal, I noticed that he had an appendectomy scar that never healed that well, I immediately informed him of this.  He stopped screaming at me and turned ashen white.  What I saw was a keloid, which I’d never heard of at the tender young age of ten.

The principal immediately called my parents in an effort to determine what the hell was going on.  All that my parents said in response to his questions were; “Yes, he can do that, but don’t ask anymore questions because we don’t understand it either and we simply choose to ignore it.”

With that, the principal once again sternly warned me that if another episode like this were to occur, I would be expelled from school and very likely arrested.   And while there were future episodes of my spontaneously turning itself on, I wisely never spoke of it again while at school.

It was now 1962 and I was in Junior High School when another aspect of my medical intuitive ability surfaced, one that literally knocked me off my feet.

Whenever a certain girl named Helene got within ten feet of me, I became very dizzy, light-headed and lost consciousness. There were several occasions where I wasn’t even aware that Helene was approaching me from behind, yet still I passed out.  As a thirteen-year-old, I wasn’t even aware of the fact that Helene was epileptic.  Nor would I have even understood what such a condition involved medically.  The school administrators and my parents were of course concerned that I might be ill as well as Helene. Fortunately, I was not.

When I first started working with Dr. Thelma Moss in 1969 at UCLA’s former parapsychology lab there was a young female research assistant named Alice who worked with her.   What was odd was that every time I was near Alice I’d start feeling nauseous, dizzy and light-headed, the same way I did around Helene years earlier.  What shock, I discovered that Alice was epileptic.   Needless to say, I kept my distance from Alice.

In fact, the formal, scientific study done on me by the late Thelma Moss, Ph.D., Herbert H.  Eveloff, M.D. and Alice Chang. M.A., “A Laboratory Investigation of Telepathy: The Study of A Psychic”, published in Behavioral Neuropsychiatry, Vol. 6, Numbers 1-12, pp. 71-80, April-December 1974—January-March 1975, showed clear and present evidence of my ability to remotely perceive what other people were physically feeling from quite a distance.  Moreover, there were recurring and very tantalizing telepathic as well as precognitive informational access displayed by me in this study.  Okay, so I’m psychic, then what?

It was extremely difficult for Drs. Moss and Eveloff to even find a peer-reviewed journal that would publish this study, as its results were a just a little too good for most to believe, which is why it took so long for it to be put into print.

Moreover, the neurophysiological data collected on me over the course of the study was so anomalous shall we say, (several EEG recordings on different dynagraphs averaged around 1,000 microvolts at 10 Hz., where normal is below 100 microvolts at around 12-20 Hz.) that even the aforementioned, publishing journal automatically assumed that the instrumentation used to collect such data must have been malfunctioning and in need of repair, which meant that the results were, at best, artifactual, and as such, they refused to publish that specific portion of the study.

Jumping forward in time to 1972, I was attending a rather posh dinner party in Hollywood and met a gentleman who was slightly older than myself by the name of David, who was interested in the research I was doing.  When I shook his hand upon meeting, I was suddenly aware that David had a rheumatic heart condition, as I could feel my heart felt as if it suddenly started beating in an arrhythmic manner.   I asked David if my perception was accurate, and he confirmed it.  Needless to say, I sat nowhere near him for the rest of my time at the party.

It was now 1973 and I had been working in Dr. Thelma Moss’s parapsychology lab for several years.   Visiting one of the lecture seminars the lab was giving was a beautiful 21 year-old co-ed named Carol.  With pitch-black hair and large, bright blue eyes, Carol reminded me of a short, Shirley MacLaine.  One thing led to another and we were eventually dating.  It was a great, perfect relationship in every way.  But fate had it’s own plan to short-circuit this romance.

About a month or so into the relationship, Carol and I were talking when I visually noticed that there was a small tumor in (not on) Carol’s left breast and I informed her of such.   She looked at me and very nervously said “What?  What are you talking about?”  “What tumor, where’s a tumor?”  I looked at her pointing to exactly where the tumor was within her left breast and that it was benign.   Carol worryingly replied, “How can you see a tumor inside me, what are you talking about, and how do you know it’s benign?”  I said that it didn’t have any calcium around it, so it must be benign.   She looked at me as though I was playing some kind of weird, sick joke on her, which I was not.   The matter was soon forgotten, until………….

Not long thereafter, when Carol finished her degree at UCLA, she got a job working for IBM and was given a full medical work up for her medical insurance benefits.   When the results of that workup came in, Carol went ballistic, as it revealed that she did indeed have a tumor exactly where I saw it to be and after a biopsy, it thankfully was determined to be benign.

As good as this news was, the bad news was that it validated what I told her some months earlier and Carol was very concerned and upset with what I was able to do.   Carol was terrified, as she now felt like she could have no secrets from me and that she would be nothing but a piece of glass around me (which in reality she was).  She couldn’t face the idea of coming home from work to greet me always wondering what little tidbit of knowledge about her inner self I might divulge at that moment.   Therein ended my relationship with Carol.  I thought I was trying to help her, but for some, such information (that they cannot control) is, in and of itself, very unnerving.

A few years later my mother approached me with a skeptical tone asking if I could psychically diagnose what was wrong with my father, her husband.  I first asked my mother if his problem was visually discernible, and she said no, it was not.  So I told her that I would do it.

I sat down next to my father on the couch and did my thing.  Immediately, I said that he was suffering from a hernia in his groin region.  Both my parents turned a little white and acknowledged that I was correct, but then my mother said that I must have guessed as to what it was.  I guessed?  I only said one thing and it was correct.  I did not mention or reference any other kind of medical problem my father might have had.   That was the last time my parents asked me to do such.

In the mid-1970’s I appeared on “Psychic Wonders with Christine Lund” on KABC-TV News for a week straight, where I diagnosed a different journalist each day for seven consecutive days.  The results were normal for me, where I was easily able to discern what was medically wrong with each newscaster on each day (recorded in advance). 

However, what wasn’t normal for me was the utter lack of response from anyone, that is, no phone calls or letters to the old UCLA parapsychology lab regarding what I did.  It was somewhat odd, in that I expected there to be some type of reaction other than the lack of one. 

No wait, there was one reaction, and that was from my parents, who were extremely embarrassed by my appearance on KABC News, and their friends who also saw me on the news and simply assumed I was nuts, which they already believed.  Perhaps the lack of public response was because I didn’t spew the normal crap of exclaiming that what I was doing was the result of my channeling of some long dead physician.  The only reaction I ever really learned about other than what’s just been stated, was that UCLA,, it’s medical center and the old Neuropyschiatric Institute where our lab was located, had a very negative reaction which was part of the lab’s demise.  For more on this matter, go to another blog on this site entitled “Legacy’s End”, which is all about our old lab in some detail.

In 1983 a good friend of mine, filmmaker Jose Escamilla, set me up on a blind date with a beautiful girl named Jodie. She was stunning, looking very much like Jane Badler, one of the evil alien leaders from the original “V”  TV series from 1983.  In fact, when we were dating, people would come up to her asking for her autograph as they thought she was Jane Badler.

So Jodie and I are having dinner at a restaurant in Sherman Oaks within the San Fernando Valley, and she eventually says “Jose said you were psychic, what kind of things can you do to prove such to me right now?”   My response was short and direct; “I can medically diagnose you if you’re interested?”   Jodie skeptically told me to go for it.

After a couple of minutes of focusing, I told Jodie that she had several problems.  The first was that she suffered from upper gastrointestinal disorder, a follicular cyst on her left ovary and endometriosis (a sloughing off of the intrauterine lining). Jodie simply looked at me shaking her head, as nothing I had just said meant anything to her.   I strongly suggested that she go to see her OBGYN and get checked out, which she eventually did.

Jodie got back to me some time later and verified everything I told her about her body.  Her OBGYN was of course very curious as to how I could tell her such things upon just meeting her.  He asked me if I was an MD and I said no, but I know a great deal about medicine due to my degree in psychophysiology.

I tried explaining what it is I do to him and he was very skeptical about it (what else is new?) and insecure, as he spent all that time in medical school and in practice to have someone like me come along and do what MD’s and tests normally do, but in seconds and totally non-invasive.

While my medical disclosures to Jodie did not end our relationship, her eventually becoming anorexic and bulimic eventually did.   Sad, as we did get along so very well and my being a medical intuitive didn’t seem to drive her away from me at all.  Her emotional problems and GI disorders did.

In early 1992 I met a stunning girl named Judy through common friends and we began dating.  Judy bore a striking resemblance to a shorter version of the actress Joan Severance.

Everything was fine until I started sensing that her health took a rapid nose-dive.   When I was around Judy I started feeling that her heart had a prolapsed mytral valve, that her upper lungs were starting to become impaired and that early menopause had started.   When I mentioned this to Judy, she was totally unaware of what was going on, but as she starting to feel kind of weak and sick most of the time, so she went to get a full checkup.

After visiting her physician, Judy discovered that my diagnosis was indeed correct, and therein ended the relationship as I was feeling her symptoms as if they were my own, and she had become way too ill to even think about being involved with anyone.

In 1994 I was hired to do some engineering tech writing for the development of an early form of photonic computing system and ancillary elements.  I met the owners of the company and the engineer they were already working with, a man in his mid-thirties named Mark.

As I approached Mark to shake his hand I once again felt disoriented and light-headed, as if I were about to pass out.  When I shook his hand, I almost passed out.  What a surprise, Mark’s was epileptic.  During the course of our working together I made it a point to stay at least ten feet away from at all times.

In the spring of 1999, an old girlfriend named Linda just dropped in on me after more than fifteen years.  She looked fantastic, as if she hadn’t aged at all.  No lines, no wrinkles, no fat.   While we were talking outside I clearly saw what looked like a giant jellyfish all over Linda’s upper chest. She was wearing a halter-top, as it was quite warm, therefore her upper chest was exposed. While moving slightly closer to her I started to ask what that was on her chest, but then I understood that it wasn’t on her chest, it was within it………..breast cancer.

Immediately, I told Linda to go and have some mammograms done to find out what was going on with her chest.  Even though Linda knew me from about 1974 and was well aware if what I do, she chose to either ignore my comments or simply not respond.

Several months later Linda called to inform me that she did have mammograms done and revealed the both her breasts were riddled with tumors.  She had a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery as a result.

It was summer 2008 and I was attending a screening of The Dark Knight at the Director’s Guild Theater on Sunset Blvd. in West Hollywood.   I was meeting a longtime friend there I knew from back in the mid-1970’s at UCLA.  The fact that we drove separately to the event was going to be a significant part of the evening’s events.

Loren and I met inside, we were soon seated, and shortly thereafter the movie began.  I was deeply involved in what was on the screen, but suddenly I was distracted by sharp, burning and cramping pains in my bladder.  What was going on?  I’ve never had any problems with my bladder before.

Within a matter of minutes, Loren received an emergency cell phone call from her daughter and had to leave the screening, while I stayed behind.  Before she left, I asked Loren if she needed my assistance in the matter and she said it wasn’t necessary.

Most interestingly, once Loren had gone, so was the pain coming from my bladder.  How odd.   It wasn’t until the next day when I spoke with Loren that I learned that she had a really bad bladder infection at the time as I was sitting right next to her, and as we’d been out of contact with each other for more than 25 years, she had no way of knowing about my sensitivity to such medical matters.

I guess that in the future I should ask people I’m with if they’re experiencing any medical problems before even sitting down next to them in the theater, as some years earlier while attending a movie in Century City, I started feeling pain in my right kidney for no apparent reason while sitting next to a total stranger and asked the friend sitting on my right if it was his problem.  It was not, but the man, a total stranger, sitting to my left overheard me and commented that he was having problems in this right kidney.   OMG!

Fourth of July weekend of 2013, and one my friends and colleagues was in town and wanted to introduce me to his new girlfriend and her children.  I knew nothing of Susan or her kids, but that was all about to change as my friend had asked me to do a medical intuitive reading on them.

Upon looking at Susan’s 8-year-old son, I saw what was probably the most unusual image I’ve ever seen in my many years of doing such readings. Put very bluntly, it appeared that the frontal lobes of his brain were simply missing, as the space was completely dark and vacant.  It was almost as if a balloon had deflated within the boy’s head, leaving that part of his skull empty.   What the?

It turns out that Susan’s son has cortical encephalopathy (cortical encephalitis), wherein the disease totally atrophied and then destroyed his frontal lobes, exactly what I saw with my most interesting vision.  His mother didn’t even know what to say to me, except to ask my colleague whether or not he informed me as to her son’s condition, which he did not.

I then moved my head and began looking at Susan and beheld an equally disturbing site.  Susan’s lungs looked like really old, dark brown paper bags with large black spots throughout them.  As I was having difficulty breathing, it was evident to me that Susan had been a very heavy smoker, but that she also suffered from COPD.  Susan nodded her head in confirmation.

My problem is that I cannot turn this ability off, and believe me I’ve tried.  I can turn it on with great ease and use it until the cows come home, but I cannot prevent it from functioning in that I will often feel it, even if I do not see it with my X-ray vision.

Back in 1980, I met an attractive girl named Sheila while teaching parapsychology at Beverly Hills High School Adult Education.  She invited me to dinner at her house in West Los Angeles.

Instead of sitting directly across from her at her table, I was seated immediately to her right but on the table’s thin edge.   After eating, I happened to glance towards her and noticed that she was wearing some kind of jeans, but I also was able to see that she had really strange pigmentation on the skin of her thighs, even though her jeans were full length, so I casually mentioned it her without giving it a second’s thought.  Sheila turned beet-red, immediately stood up at the table, ordering me to leave, which I did.   Oh well, I was only 31 years old back then and still hadn’t learned to sometimes bite my own tongue.

In 2006, while getting my yearly physical checkup at my internist’s office, I once again did what I did above without giving my words a second thought.  When the doctor approached me to take my blood pressure, the first thing out of my mouth was to ask if he’s having problems with his lumbar region.   I then said that he’s been having upper respiratory problems as well.  That was followed, by my asking him if he was about to retire soon.  His eyes grew quite large in response to my comments.  But then came the clincher.  I asked him if he drove a black on black Lexus SC 430.

My physician was dumbstruck as he knew nothing about me other than my medical condition and that I was was kind of stoic and unemotional.  However, he confirmed my diagnosis of him and the fact that he did drive the exact car I had just mentioned.   He immediately left the room as if I had shot him in the ass with a BB gun, and asked one of his associates in the office to finish examining me.  He retired shortly thereafter.

On Thursday, May 8th of this year, I met a young lady for lunch that I hadn’t seen in more than a year.  I originally met this woman at the 2012 Auto Show in Los Angeles, where she was working as a model promoting some automotive product.  We had only met on one other occasion in 2013, and I knew almost nothing about her or her personal life.  That was all about to change very suddenly though.

Upon meeting, we hugged for a moment, and my head suddenly felt like it was about to explode, horrible global pressure throughout my skull.  When we let go of each other and moved apart, the pain somewhat diminished.  We sat down to order our lunch and then she came over to my side of the booth to show me photos of her son and their cats.  The instant she was right next to me, the pressure and pain in my head started once again, and this time, it felt like I was going to either throw up or lose consciousness.  But I didn’t, as she moved back to her side of the booth.  What was this?  This girl was less than half my age and looked perfectly healthy.

While we’re eating and talking, I suddenly felt like I’m experiencing hypothermia as I started shivering very intensely.  Why was I shivering?  The restaurant was not cold or hot, and I was wearing a light jacket.  The shivering persisted as the sense of bodily hypothermia grew even stronger.  The girl was looking at me rather oddly, for she had no idea as what was going on, and neither did I.  After this painful and hypothermic onslaught, we both agreed that it was best to end our lunch immediately.  Foolishly, we again hugged before leaving each other, and this time, the cerebral pain was excruciating and I immediately pulled away from the woman.  Once I moved a considerable distance away from her and was back in my car, I felt fine.

Several hours later, I discovered why I had felt what I did when near this beautiful woman.  Where to begin?

Apparently, she’s suffered crippling, chronic migraines since the age of ten (she’s now 28), which often caused her to throw up and black out.  She also has chronic insomnia as well as a strange form of hypothermia where her extremities, hands and feet, are always ice cold to the touch, and often, her entire body is equally frostbitten as she describes it.  The only time in her life when her migraines, insomnia and hypothermia vanished, was when she was pregnant with her son.

Well, needless to say, I will never be in the immediate presence of this young woman again.  And as insane as all this is, if we had become romantically involved, despite our age difference, I might have very likely died being that close to her physically for any length of time.  I suspect that no medical examiner would have been able precisely determine what caused me to suddenly die while making love.  The whole damn thing is downright frightening the way my body reacts to the presence of physically ill individuals.

Okay, so we’re all aware of the fact that I can do things that most other people can’t?   Why and how?  Those are the real questions.

I’ve heard of a few other people who can do pretty much the same thing that I do, with some differences.

However, I have only met one of person in my life who is a true medical intuitive.  His name is Jack Rourke (jackrourke.net), and has been my friend and colleague since early 2007.   I’ve seen his incredible ability at work, and it’s truly remarkable for a man as young, normal and grounded as he is.

Can people be taught to do this particular thing?  I haven’t the foggiest idea, although I knew from my own research that some people have a higher level of inherent psychic potential that can be honed to a fine point with the proper training and the use of positive reinforcement and feedback.  This is discussed in detail in another blog on this site, “Learned Psi: Training To Be Psychic”.

Bottom line here is that everyone’s mind goes after different types or kinds of information that it’s subconscious and unconscious find meaningful and relevant.  It’s hard to re-condition a mind once it has learned to seek out and search for information that is very need relevant to its emotional wants and desires.

So if any of you have desires to be different in this sort of way, you’d better give it a second, third and fourth thought, as it could turn many people away from you for all the wrong reasons.

A final example of just how odd this type of life can be is, the response I recently received from a well-known, New Age guru in Malibu.  He asked a good friend of mine, a writer and producer who’s known me for forty-one years, if I do any kind of readings.  My friend told the guru that I only do medical intuitive readings and criminal readings (as I really hate it when people prey upon others in any way).

The guru’s response was quite telling, “Oh no, nothing that serious, never, that will scare the hell of out people.”  The only type of readings this guru wanted me to do were ones that dealt with relationships and closing big business deals.   My response was “Who cares?  I’m trying to improve people’s lives by keeping them physically healthy and preventing them from being harmed by criminals.”

Oh well, each to their own.

What you’ve just read is but a very small tip of an extremely large iceberg.

And in the end, one question remains.

Why did I develop this type of ability that is so precisely honed?

P.S.  If you think that possessing certain volitional paranormal abilities might somewhat unnerve and frighten others, just wait until you read my newest blog entitled “Retroactive Terror: Your Past Will Come Back To Haunt You”, published elsewhere on this site early 2015.  There’s an even more potentially disruptive aspect of being involved with the paranormal for a very long time.  This problem can quite easily end your very existence without directly killing you.  What you’re going to learn is far more life threatening than anything you’ve ever read about before.

 

 

 

Learned Psi: Training To Be Psychic

 

 

Is it possible to take normal, healthy, emotionally stable people who do not think they’re psychic, and haven’t really had any prior experiences to their knowledge, and train them to become functionally, reliable psychics?

YES and NO.

That is, it appears that everyone may have some latent psychic potential that can be developed and honed with the right type of positive feedback and reinforcement.

However, it’s crucial that such feedback occur very close in time to when the person makes a correct or incorrect statement, otherwise it will have little, if any, effect.  In order for this learning paradigm to function properly, a person must slowly come to recognize what internal feelings and sensations are associated with accurate paranormal information (signal) access as opposed to inaccurate information, a.k.a. primary process distortion and fantasy (noise).

I suspect that only a very small percentage of the population, maybe between five and ten percent, possess such inherent faculties that are consistently demonstrable.

This is somewhat comparable to sports in that most people can occasionally participate in some kind of sport when young, but few have the strength, stamina, endurance, reflexes and coordination necessary to become a professional athlete in any given sport.

As I’m really into motorsports like Formula 1 and American Le Mans road racing, let’s just look at that particular event for a direct analog.

While everyone can essentially drive a car, few could tolerate the extremely high g-loading forces on the neck and arms, where your body would suddenly feel like it weighs four to five times it’s weight.  Even fewer would have the stamina, endurance, depth perception, reflexes and hand, eye, foot coordination to be competitive in such a grueling physical sport.  But this doesn’t mean that one cannot learn things to improve their driving skills on the road.

Our psi training groups were held at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute (NPI) [now the Semel Institute] on Wednesday nights from 1971 through 1980.  These training groups, applied positive feedback and reinforcement incorporating a free-verbal response (FVR) as opposed to forced-choice method, as a learning paradigm to enhance and train paranormal perception.

Put more simply, we were attempting to teach people how to differentiate and distinguish between normal fantasy and/or cognitively processed thoughts and informational input from sources that are non-localized from them in space and time, e.g. ESP.

In those halcyon times, these perceptions were referred to as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition and retrocognition, as opposed to the all-encompassing “remote viewing” nomenclature of today.  A rose by any other name.

Over the first few years, we had numerous recurring visitors from the CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), Office of Naval Research (ONR), Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI), the National Security Agency (NSA), National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), Defense Language Institute (DLI) and the Defense Advanced Research Project’s Agency (DARPA) as they became very interested in what we were doing and had already achieved.

Initially, we had no knowledge whatsoever of who these recurring visitors were or where they were from until the sessions were completed (a single blind condition).

On one particular early visit, our group was simply given the first name of a man.  We suddenly began describing very specific details of a new nuclear ballistic missile submarine and it’s new, highly accurate, long-range missiles.

When the feedback part of this session was reached and the room lights we turned back on, we were witness to several men sitting there with their collective mouths hanging open with ashen white faces.  What in the hell was going on?

Of what they could reveal, our comments very accurately described many of the details for the new Trident ballistic missile submarine (a boomer) and its ten-MIRV’D, D-5 missile.   This was all highly classified, sensitive data that we could not have known or had access to.

I guess these visitors were impressed by what we did, as these military intelligence officers immediately demanded the surrender of the audio tape from that session and that we all sign national security oaths.  Needless to say, we complied.

Representatives of the various intelligence groups made repeated visits to our group over time to assure themselves that our success on that first night was not a coincidence or a trick.

After we demonstrated that what we were doing was real, demonstrable and reproducible, the various intelligence groups asked that we work with and for them in several capacities.

Sounded like an interesting and compelling proposition?

However, there was one unanticipated and insurmountable obstacle regarding this; UCLA.

Apparently, both UCLA and the NPI itself, were horrified at the thought of being formally, publicly and professionally linked to parapsychology, which was thought of at the time as pseudo-science and quackery by mainstream science, but especially by behavioral science.  Such an alliance could have been political suicide for a university dependent on public perception and regular endowments?

Isn’t it interesting that more than four decades later, and nothing’s really changed, has it?  Perhaps the fact that the NPI was already associated with psycho-surgery and orbital undercutting, was all the negative press it could tolerate?

Due to our unavailability dictated by university politics and damage control, the government’s focus shifted northward to Menlo Park, California.

After having conducted these groups for seven years, even the continued positive results we were achieving were now boring. You know, that been there, done that, sort of feeling.

More specifically, the ability of reaching into anothers mind or observing things at a distance, we now perceived as somewhat commonplace and ordinary.  Hard to believe, I know.

However, when there is high degree of success and continuity with such extraordinary research efforts, one tends to become jaded.  I guess that this attitude is just part of being human in that we begin taking things for granted.

In an effort to make things more interesting, we decided to attempt our first precognitive effort with this group.

We turned off the lights in the NPI’s C-floor observation/conference room and went through our normal progressive muscular relaxation procedure.  Once we had attained this hypo-metabolic state, we mentally focused on the “target” person of the next week’s first session.

In a way, the verbal reinforcements given during this part of this session were similar to what Christopher Reeve as Richard Collier in Somewhere In Time (Universal, 1980) verbalized when attempting to physically transport himself back through time.  Except of course, we didn’t expect to physically travel in time, and obviously we weren’t producing a fantasy film at the time either.

We began describing the “target” person as a tall, beautifully statuesque, blue-eyed blond girl dressed in a tan business suit.  We continued our verbalizations into the centrally placed, amplified, microphone within the otherwise sensory-deprived room as we clearly saw the specific number on the chair in which she was sitting (there were twenty-four chairs in this conference room, each of which was numbered).

As the session continued, we “saw” a very large mansion-like home, within which was a large baby-grand piano. Numerous bits of varying types of personal information continued to flow from our mouths for quite some time.  And then, silence.

Vocally piercing the darkened conference room, we all abruptly began describing a tall man wearing all black, with a black hat, black mask, a flowing black cape and an imposing sword.  I remember thinking, what kind of crap are we uttering?  The session ended and we didn’t give much thought to what we had just said because it wasn’t relevant yet.

It was now one week later and another group was about to begin.  However, on this particular evening, no guest member from the prior week was allowed to bring a visitor.  Any new participants on this night could only arrive through third parties who had not been in attendance for the last several weeks, i.e., through independent means.

When each new person arrived they were handed a sealed envelope with a number from one through twelve written on a piece of paper within it.  Once in the conference room, we rolled the dice and then asked all new visitors to open their sealed envelopes.  Whichever person’s number fit the dice roll was the randomly chosen target person for the first session.

We had all pretty much forgotten what we had said a week earlier, so when a statuesque blue-eyed, blond girl’s number matched the dice roll, we didn’t give it second thought.

I asked this stunning 19-yr old woman, named Toni, to replay the audiotape from the week before and if she heard any statements that directly related to her, stop the tape and comment on them. If the statements were incorrect, let the tape run without interruption.  Toni didn’t immediately understand what I just said, forcing me clarify this protocol again.

Toni listens, as voices clearly describe her appearance and clothing in detail as well as the exact number of the chair she is seated in.  Her look is one of astonishment, although the best was yet to come.  When she hears the specific description of the mansion in the hills with the baby grand piano, her eyes open even wider, as those data points were also correct.  But those could have been coincidence, couldn’t they?

However, then came what I believe to be one of the most fascinating pieces of precognized information that has ever been documented?  Let’s see if you agree.

When we finished our discourse on the black costumed man with the mask and sword, Toni let out a somewhat muffled scream.  There was hesitation in her voice and for good reason.

Toni looked at me and said: “How do you know who I am?”  My immediate response was to look at her while shrugging my shoulders, “What do you mean, who you are?”  Toni tells our group that her full name is “Toni Williams”.  We all looked at Toni with blank, expressionless faces, as we did not understand what she was referring to.  Who was Toni Williams?

Realizing that our group really didn’t know who “Toni Williams” was, she connected the dots for us.  Apparently, Toni knew all too well exactly who the masked, darkly dressed, swordsman was.  In fact, she knew him for her entire life.

The ornately costumed man turned out to be her father, Guy Williams, the actor who played Zorro in the Disney television series from the late fifties and early sixties. You might better remember Guy Williams from another TV series in the mid-sixties, where he played Professor John Robinson in CBS’s Lost In Space.

Guy Williams as "Zorro"
Guy Williams as “Zorro”

 

Toni was speechless and just a little frightened.  She looked at all of us as though we were beings from another reality.  She sheepishly asked when this tape was made and we told her exactly one week earlier.  However, Toni did not even know of, or that she was even coming to our group until several hours earlier that very day!

 

Toni’s question was a simple one. How could we have so accurately described her and her surroundings seven days earlier when she wasn’t even aware of us, or of our group?

Indeed, how could we have perceived such an event unless the information pertaining to it already existed?  What are the odds of us accurately describing such state specific information about an event one hundred and sixty eight hours before it occurred?

What’s the probability of our precisely describing the Zorro character as related to his daughter one week prior to her random appearance and selection as a target in our group?  A million-to-one? A billion-to-one?  A trillion-to-one?  Okay, let’s just say astronomical and leave it at that!  Does this event sound like we were randomly guessing as to the shape of things to come?

Guy Williams
Guy Williams

Believe it or not, there have been those individuals over the decades that actually believed that we somehow deduced or logically inferred the

information described herein.  Give me a break?

Needless to say, Toni never again returned to participate in one of our research groups, as her one experience with us was more than enough. I can certainly understand how unsettling such an unusual experience can be.  But then, as I think about it, maybe I can’t.

As we were all very impressed with our first foray into the future, we attempted to replicate our results several months later, little knowing what the full emotional impact of such accurately precognized information would have on some of us.

During this second attempt things went very differently though.  All any of us could “sense” was fire, and more fire.  We didn’t know why this was, but it certainly wasn’t worth getting all that upset over.  Well, at least, not until the next day.

On that following Thursday, while up in the lab on 2-South of the NPI, I heard the arrival of many fire engines.  Racing down to the C-Floor, I discovered that our conference room had apparently caught fire due to a shorting socket that sparked the drapes covering the room’s west-facing wall.  What a coincidence and shock (oops, there’s another pun).  And no, I did not start the fire myself to produce a self-fulfilling prophecy.

After these two successful treks into the future, several of our regular group members became depressed and starting having anxiety attacks about the possibility that the future is as immutable as the past, and that free will may be little more than an illusion.

My response to these reactions was simple, “Who cares!  We’re still going to live out our lives making daily judgments and choices without knowing the shape of things to come whether the future is random and open to change or predestined.”  For some reason, my attitude regarding such matters doesn’t seem to be shared by many others.  Why is that?

For some reason, I cannot as yet fathom the belief that reality is random and chaotic.  To me personally, my experiences and research strongly suggest that reality is finitely ordered and predetermined, and this belief gives me a sense of inner peace.

Maybe I just can’t accept the notion that anything as vast and extraordinarily intricate and complex as the universe could be the result of random, chaotic energy.  No way!  Or perhaps, I’ve had way too many precognitive experiences growing up, both in and out of the lab environment to believe otherwise.

Another fascinating incident occurred several years earlier when a semi-regular to our group, Janet, decided to act as a target for the first time, something she had always refused to do.   The room lights were extinguished, the microphones were turned on and target was given as a man’s first name, and the rest followed in short order.

Many of us started describing a large, expensive home in a very rustic and seemingly lush, forested area.  The home had very large, walls made of glass looking out into what seemed like trees and shrubs.  The kitchen was lined, quite oddly, with empty jars of Bac-O -Bits.   We then began trying to phonetically articulate this man’s last name.   While I am unable to provide his name due to privacy concerns as he was and still is quite famous,  our vocalizations were within about 98% of accuracy even though it’s a rather peculiar last name.

But that was nothing compared to what was about to come forth from our collective mouths.  We began vividly describing this man being brutally mugged by several people, it was quite horrible in its ferocity.   As we were quite sickened by what we just saw in our mind’s eye, we decided to stop the session at that point.  Turning the lights back on, we handed Janet the recorder controls and told her to play back the tape and respond accordingly.

This man was someone that Janet had been dating at the time, and he lived in a house almost identical to what we had just described, even down to the point of the empty jars of Bac-O-Bits lining the lower, exposed shelves in the kitchen.   When we learned of this man’s last name, it was truly astounding as to how close our pronunciations of it were.   But when Janet hit the part of her friend being mugged and she was emphatic that such an event had never occurred to either him or her.  At least that what she believed.

Several days later I received a rather frantic call from Janet while in the lab.  She informed me that on the very night she was participating in our group, her friend was up in the San Francisco Bay area, and was being viciously mugged at the exact time her session was transpiring in our lab.

But wait, if Janet did not know what was happening to her friend hundreds of miles away, then what was the source of our accurate psychic perceptions?

Several years later, one of our regulars, a director by the name of Steve (and no, not Spielberg), who bore a striking resemblance to an older, thicker featured Christopher Reeve, brought a female friend to our group by the name of Roberta.  She also volunteered to be a target.  Other than her first name we had no idea who she was or what type of unsettling event was about to occur.

Roberta simply gave us the name Al, and that was it.  We had no way to knowing who Al was or who he was related to Roberta.

In our sensory deprived room, we began describing him as being around 6’2″, rather stocky, with reddish-brown hair and blue eyes.  We went on to discuss that he had a very unusual voice and was extremely volatile and violent, where we saw him repeatedly beating Roberta and his eventually killing her.  As our comments were getting more and more disturbing in nature, we thought that it was best that we stop the session at that point.

With the lights on, Roberta took the recorder control and started playing the tape back.  She was visibly upset, and for good reason.

Roberta told us that Al was her husband, the actor named Albert Salmi, who was always cast as the heavy or villain.  If you’ve watched TV during the

Albert Salmi

last sixty years, you’ve certainly seen him in everything from Cheyenne, Bonanza, Alfred Hitchcock to three appearances on the original Twilight Zone series, two of the half-hour shows and one hour-long episode.

Remember the show entitled “Execution” (1960), where a man named Joe Caswell, is about to be hanged for murder in the wild west when he suddenly disappears from the hangman’s noose and appears within a time machine at the laboratory of Russel Johnson (the professor from Gilligans Island) in 1960?  Johnson utters one of the all-time great one liners “I know this isn’t very scientific, but I don’t like his looks”.

Caswell eventually kills Johnson’s character and ends up being strangled with a window-shade cord by a contemporary burglar.  The burglar then ends up wandering into the time machine which he accidentally activates, sending him back to the past where he end’s up materializing in the same hangman’s noose that Caswell began the show in.

Our physical description of Salmi was perfect, as were many other details of his life and living conditions.  Finally, Roberta gets to the end where we commented on Salmi’s volatile/violent nature.

Very reluctantly, she admitted that Al’s been chronically beating her for years and she fears that one day he will kill her.  As if this happened yesterday, we told here to leave Albert ASAP.  She looked at us as if to say “What, leave Al?”

More than twelve years later, on April of 1990, Albert Salmi, then 62, first shot his wife Roberta, then 55,  and then himself.

Back at our groups in the late ’70’s, Steve brings yet another guest to our group.   This time, it’s well known character actor who’s worked in both movies and television for decades.  You’d recognize his face and voice in a heartbeat.  Due to privacy concerns, his name will not be mentioned here, but let’s call him Robert.

Robert volunteers to be the target.  The protocols are followed and we begin uttering some very strange things in the pitch black room.  While we were clearly given the name of a woman, several of us simultaneously start commenting on the fact that this woman, was actually a man, a transsexual.

When we finished with the session, Robert began his commentary on our words as if nothing we said was at all relevant.  As Robert began verifying one thing after another, the tape finally came to the part where we discussed the altered sexuality of Robert’s friend, whom he lived with.

Once Robert heard what we had said, he turned red in the face, rapidly stood up from his chair and abruptly left the room, never to return.

Steve later informed us about Robert’s transsexual girlfriend, which then explained his rapid departure from our room.  This was probably the last thing that Robert ever expected us to pick up, which is why it occurred.

In what was now well known to us, the more deeply buried something was within the target person’s mind, the more likely it was to show up in our comments.  And, as part of the introduction to new group participants was to not censor yourself when verbalizing your thoughts, we freely spoke whatever thoughts entered our heads, and it was all too often quite accurate.

Perhaps the most unexpected and astonishing moments of this psi training program was when a girl by the name of Paula visited our group in late 1979.  Paula was a rather intense poltergeist agent who is discussed in my book Aliens Above, Ghosts Below: Explorations of the Unknown.  While her session was unremarkable in terms of its informational content, it’s visual component was most memorable.

While seated in our pitch-black room, a very large, bright red, luminous anomaly was emitted by her petite form.

This amazing visual display was about the size of an average human head and almost perfectly spherical in shape.  It rapidly shot out across the rather larger room and then just disappeared as if someone had turned off a light bulb.

Our entire group jumped in almost perfect unison upon witnessing this incredible fireworks-like manifestation, and several of us responded with a loud vocal reaction.

We immediately turned the lights on to find Paula crouched down and cowering in her chair, like a terrified 8-year old child.   She immediately got up and ran out of the room and the NPI, immediately driving herself home.  She never returned to the group, and I do not blame her.

Our psi training groups ran from 1971 through 1980 at the NPI.  Once the lab closed, we moved the groups to various off-campus office complexes in the Westwood area for several years and then into the home of one of our regular members.

The program finally ended in 1987, with over 3,200 separate sessions being conducted.   The qualitative and quantitative data collected was truly extraordinary and the evidence was overwhelming in terms of demonstrating a highly reproducible paranormal event on demand.

That’s why all the various government agencies were so damn interested in what we were doing.  We witnessed meteorological effects, tidal effects, as well as the far more subtle, yet pronounced, emotional ones.

I seriously doubt if I’ll ever again experience such a consistent level of controlled paranormal experimental results.

Those were the days.

What was learned and accomplished from this program was truly amazing.   That psi is both space-like and time-like, which in layman’s terms means that it is not affected by distance or time, in that it is indeed possible to access information regarding people and events that are not local to you in both time and space.

That there’s really no fundamental difference between telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition or retrocognition.   What we call such remotely accessed information entirely depends on where we are at the time we perceive it and where it appears to come from.  That is, if it comes from our past, we call such information retrocognition. If it comes from our future, we describe such perception as precognition.  If the information stems from a human mind at any distance, it’s classified as telepathic, and if such remotely accessed information is spatially displaced from us without the mediation of another mind, we call that clairvoyance.  In the end, it’s all little more than than remote accessing of information from our bodies without working through our normal sensory systems.

But most importantly, was that it is indeed possible to “train” some people to become psychic.  However, there is a major qualifier here.

Just as it is possible to improve anyone’s golfing score or auto racing skills, few will become professionals athletes in either sport.  Everyone comes to the party with an inherent or latent psychic potential.

On one side side of the bell curve are those people who with some training will become psychic superstars in the purist sense of the word.

On the other side of the curve are those people who are totally immune to any type of learning methods as their psychic potential is extremely low or non-existent.

In the middle of the curve, are those people who have occasional encounters with paranormal perception, but it’s almost random and mostly totally dependent on the specific situation, where emotionally stressful events are the trigger and mediator.

Additionally, each person who does positively respond to these methods seems to develop along different lines.  That is, our psychic perception is attracted to and repelled from information just as our conscious mind is.  This is a very subjective, need-relevant based mechanism, where we pay attention to those things that are very important to us and we’re attracted to, or repulsed from.  You could almost refer to this process as being related to the approach-avoidance mechanism spoken of in psychology.

One final word of caution here though.

We did have those situations wherein once someone’s consciousness was opened up to this data acquisition method, they began having problems mediating the process and turning it off.  And all too often, information was perceived that was very upsetting, unnerving and anxiety producing, especially if it dealt with matters that were out of the control of the recipient.

When this occurred, individuals would have severe anxiety or panic attacks, that occasionally resulted in serious emotional scarring.  I could write another entire book, based purely on the fallout experienced due to the lack of any proper coping mechanism such people had to this alteration of their perceptual abilities.  From developing a messianic complex, to religious zealotry, delusions of grandeur, paranoid schizophrenia, dissociative thinking and borderline personalities.   It’s was all there, and they were not that uncommon of a reaction to this process.

URGENT:  THE CONSCIOUSNESS ALTERING PROCESS BRIEFLY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS NOT A JOKE OR TO BE TAKEN LIGHTLY.  IT IS A FUNDAMENTAL RESTRUCTURING OF THE WAY WE PROCESS INFORMATION BOTH WITHIN AND WITHOUT OF OURSELVES.  THIS CAN DRAMATICALLY ALTER ONES LIFE AND NOT ALWAYS IN THE MOST POSITIVE WAYS. 

IN WAYS FAR TOO DETAILED AND LENGTHY TO EXPLAIN HERE, SUCH SUDDEN AND PERHAPS UNFORESEEN CONSCIOUSNESS DEVELOPMENT CAN BE A TRAP, WHEREIN ONE PAYS MORE ATTENTION TO WHAT’S GOING ON INSIDE THEIR HEAD AS OPPOSED TO WHAT’S TRANSPIRING AROUND THEM IN THE REAL, PHYSICAL WORLD.  ADDITIONALLY,  THERE IS ALWAYS THE INHERENT PRIMARY PROCESS (NOISE) WHICH WILL CREATE DISTORTION, AS WELL AS AN ELEMENT OF REFABRICATION AND DENIAL. 

IN LAYMAN’S TERMS, THIS MEANS THAT THIS MECHANISM IS FLAWED WITH A RELATIVELY LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO IN MOST CASES AND DOES NOT WORK PERFECTLY.  FACTORS SUCH AS MOTIVATION, STIMULATION, FATIGUE, BOREDOM, ANXIETY AND PROACTIVE INHIBITION ARE ALL MEDIATING VARIABLES GENERALLY NOT UNDER ONES CONTROL THAT WILL INEVITABLY AFFECT ONE’S PERFORMANCE IN THIS REGARD.

THEREFORE, ENTER THIS REALM AT YOUR OWN WELL-INFORMED RISK.

Disinforming The Paranormal and Ufology

 

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You all know what disinformation is, right?  This method, commonly used in war-fighting and intelligence work, is VERY important to consider when dealing with the paranormal and ufology, as it appears that the powers that be want to keep the public both uninformed and misdirected on these topics.

Disinformation is when people are fed erroneous information regarding a specific subject(s) with the intention of creating an illusory reality so as to misdirect ones’ attention from one event onto another, or to obfuscate the truth with a generic lie.

One method is where a major lie is surrounded with many truthful facts.  When the truths are proven to be genuine, the lie in their midst is taken along for the same ride and believed to be authentic.

Another common method is where a great truth is encapsulated amongst many lies. When the lies are proven to be misinformation, the truth is also believed to be a lie.

As simple as these disinformational methods appear, they work very effectively on people who are conditioned to believe in what they’re told by authority figures, are uneducated, ignorant or generally apathetic about things they don’t know much about.  It’s often necessary to read between-the-lines when governments are officially pontificating or sponsors are advertising their products on TV.  I’m sure that we”re all quite familiar with the term “truth in advertising”, right?

One relatively recent instance involved our government’s officially terminating it’s remote viewing program some time ago.  Afterwords, they hired some professional debunkers (whose names have been omitted here to avoid any legal consequences) to re-evaluate the results from the many years of research and application.

Once these debunkers finished their manipulation of this program’s statistics, it suddenly appeared as if the entire remote viewing program was little more than an experiment in stupidity, gullibility and naivety coupled with an error in judgment and reasoning on the part of our military and intelligence community (which of course is always possible when dealing with any government).

These debunkers then claimed that with their “corrected” statistics, all the years of significantly positive qualitative and quantitative results were actually meaningless dogma and amounted to little more than the work of ignorant zealots who were misinterpreting their own data.   One may ask why our government even resorted to disinformation regarding such an underfunded and poorly utilized intelligence program? The reason is rather simple and yet complicated at the same time.

Even after all the development work, numerous experiments and applied usage of remote viewing, no one really understood how and why it worked, and why, on occasion, it failed.  Our scientific theories and models of space-time and consciousness are far too crude to encompass such extraordinary perceptual events.

However, the brilliant minds in our government wanted to insure that our immediate, as well as any potential future enemies, could never employ such non-localized spying techniques against us, as there are no known effective countermeasures against remote viewing.

The most efficient way to protect us against against future paranormal adversaries would be to make everyone believe that remote viewing never worked to begin with and that it’s nothing more than a waste of time, money, material and assets.  Yeah right?

During the initial phases of the remote viewing work, the United States Navy was so paranoid that Soviet psychic spies could penetrate into our deep diving boomers (nuclear ballistic missile submarines) and the Strategic Air Command’s underground ICBM launch complexes to psychically force (remote influence) our servicemen into pushing the wrong buttons or not pushing any buttons at all, that the military were actually trying to design and develop talisman and/or amulets to be worn by servicemen in sensitive positions to shield their minds from being remotely controlled.

However, I seriously doubt as to whether such ridiculously absurd countermeasure efforts produced any results.  This may really sound off the wall, but it’s true.

But this is what tends to occur when we’re dealing with a subject that is not fully understood, other than being aware of some of its immediate, although limited, applications.  As to whether the debunker’s efforts succeeded regarding remote viewing we may never know, but that doesn’t mean that they won’t keep attempting such similar efforts.

For far more detailed information regarding the nefarious and devious methods employed by our own intelligence community to discredit the voluminous data collected in remote viewing research, read another blog on this site entitled “Remote Viewing: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”.

Disinformation can be used in many different ways, but the two most common forms of it’s use are the following.   A significant truth is surrounded with many lies, and once said lies are uncovered and exposed as falsehoods, the truth within the middle of them is discarded and forgotten as little more than just another of the many lies. The inverse, is where a powerful lie is surrounded with considerable truths, and when the surrounding truths are confirmed as factual, the lie within the middle is also believed to be factual.

A simple way of describing the essence of the disinformational method is a line from an episode of the original Star Trek series entitled “I,  Mudd”, wherein Kirk utters the following fascinating words to an android bent on controlling and stealing the Enterprise; “Everything I’m saying to you is a lie and I’m lying to you now”.  Confusing, disturbing and certainly disorienting, but nonetheless, effective.  Precise, concise and succinct, is not it not?

Most people are probably not aware of the fact that our government’s intelligence apparatus has dramatically affected media such as newspapers,  television and radio to disinform the public regarding UFOs for many decades.  One of the best sources of information on this topic are two books written by Richard M. Dolan; UFOs and the National Security State, Vol. 1 & 2.

Apparently, the powers that be do not want the public to believe in the existence of UFOs or aliens.  The reasons for this attitude on the part of our government are numerous, and many of these are discussed in Dolans’ excellent books as well as my own.  Ever notice how at the end of almost every TV news story on UFOs there is a line thrown out by the reporter ridiculing the entire matter?

During a UFO flap that occurred during the mid-1990’s there was one report that came in of a large, glowing object hovering over someones home in the mid-west.  The object in question was probably even bigger than the house it hovered over, yet the media suggested that what people really saw was the moon or the planet Venus.  What?

If a person cannot differentiate between the moon that they’ve seen all their life or a distant light in the sky (Venus) and a very large, structured, glowing object hovering over their home, they need to be institutionalized, as they’ve lost their mind and are now psychotic.

This brings me to the most current bit of moronic, idiotic and downright historically absurd piece of disinformation I’ve ever seen regarding UFOs.   A new book written by Annie Jacobsen, Area 51,  goes into some detail discussing many previously classified military/intelligence programs at Nellis Air Force Base’s Groom Lake and Area 51.   Much of what Jacobsen writes of is very precise, historically accurate but already established within the public domain long before her book was even written , except when it speaks of UFOs and the 1947 Roswell, New Mexico crash.

The Air Force has spun numerous tall tales in their attempt to obfuscate the truth about Roswell.  At first, it was just a weather balloon.  Then, several decades later, the story was changed to something called “Project Mogul”, a high-altitude surveillance balloon used to monitor nuclear tests within the old Soviet Union before we had spy planes and satellites.

But wait, that didn’t account for the diminutive alien bodies allegedly recovered from the crash site.  The next level of disinformational spin from the Air Force was that the strangely colored bodies were nothing more than crash dummies utilized to test new types of ejection seats on supersonic aircraft.

Wait a minute, the crash dummies (full sized, not little humanoids as described by Roswell witnesses) were not even used by the Air Force until the mid-to-late 1950’s, so how could this explain the bodies recovered at Roswell in 1947?

Oh, well it seems that the people who claimed to have seen the bodies really couldn’t remember what decade they were in at the time and mistakenly thought it was 1947, when it was actually 1955-1958?  Sure, we can all lose a decade or so every now and then.  Happens every day, right?  Or is it every decade?  How stupid do these government liars really think we are?   Pretty damn stupid and ignorant apparently.

Jacobsen’s book spins the tale that the Soviets, with the help of Dr. Joseph Mengele from Nazi Germany, helped them genetically engineer some tiny, alien looking human pilots that they inserted into a makeshift spacecraft that was derived from the Horton brother’s flying wing design for the Nazi Luftwaffe at the end of WWII.

This piloted vehicle was then purposefully crashed in the New Mexican desert in the hope of triggering mass hysteria and panic across the United States similar to what occurred during Orson Well’s 1938 War of The Worlds radio broadcast.

My god, these people are working in the wrong profession, as they should really be science fiction writers within the entertainment industry.  Interesting story to say the least, but full of more holes than a large block of Swiss cheese.  Where to begin?

Let’s see, Joseph Mengele did NOT go to the Soviet Union at the end of second world war.  There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever suggesting that Mengele even desired to go to the Soviet Union, or that they wanted to get their hands on a real alien body that the Nazi’s might have recovered from an alleged, unconfirmed crash of a UFO in 1936 within Germany’s Black Forrest.

Had Mengele even attempted to find sanctuary there, he would be been immediately killed.  He may have come to the U.S. for a while, but clearly ended up and died in Argentina.  How could anyone, including Mengele, have genetically engineered anything back in 1947 when DNA had not even been discovered yet?  That wasn’t until the early 1960’s.

Next, the first Horton Brothers 229 flying wing crashed during one of its’ early test flights in Germany due to its port engine failure.  The debris and a second, unfinished prototype, were brought to the U.S. along with the Horton brothers after the war.

In fact, Jack Northrop’s YB-49 flying wing, so beautifully depicted in the original War of the Worlds movie (1956) was, in many ways, derived from the Horton Brothers flying wing.  Due to some poorly clarified political backstabbing during the 1950’s, Northrop’s YB-49, which first flew in 1948, was never deployed into military service even though it apparently demonstrated superior aerodynamic qualities, greater ordinance capacity and higher cruising speeds on military power.  So far, Jacobsen’s batting zero.

One last note here regarding her claims.  The configuration depicted within her book representative of the crashed Roswell craft could not have flown based on any form of jet or rocket propulsion known back in 1947.

Additionally, the description of the Roswell crash material does not even conform to any type of aerospace materials that existed then or now, except some crude forms of memory metals currently in use, but they do not possess many of the qualities described by the individuals who held remnants of the real Roswell crash.  In the end, there’s one final question that needs to be addressed regarding Jacobsen and her book.

Is Jacobsen a mole working for the U.S. government’s military/intelligence apparatus or, is she just a naive, gullible and relatively ignorant reporter who is being used by our government to propagate more erroneous myths and disinformation?

Given that she’s a writer/reporter for the Los Angeles Times newspaper, what better way to be unwittingly used than as an asset for our government as they already are familiarized with how our government’s used the media to disinform the public regarding UFOs?  Either of these possibilities are equally plausible.

However, lending support to the latter of these possibilities was the appearance a new show “Area 51 Declassified” on the National Geographic Channel last Sunday evening, for which Jacobsen was a consultant.  Given the coordination between the release of her book and the immediate broadcast of this show, strongly suggests that this entire matter is a very well orchestrated disinformational campaign put forth by factions within our government.

Reinforcing this belief was the airing of a two-hour National Geographic show entitled “When Aliens Attack”, immediately preceding the Area 51 show.  Why in the world this show was produced is really a mystery.

“When Aliens Attack” posited the unlikely scenario that the Earth will be invaded and conquered by malevolent extraterrestrial life forms in search of protein and chlorophyll, and that we have already prepared a battle plan or contingency combat strategy to deal with such an event.

For a government that’s been denying the very existence of UFOs and aliens for more than sixty years, why are they even planning for such potential hostilities?  That’s the equivalent of planning for Godzilla’s or Rodan’s hostile actions (and remember, they’re movie monsters).

Given how long it normally takes to successfully pitch, sell, produce and air a show on TV (especially on this subject), this whole matter stinks to high heaven of a well organized project to dramatically rewrite history and misdirect our attention in order to dissuade us from believing in UFOs and their occupants.  Jacobsen’s publisher has put forth an extraordinarily intense PR media campaign on this book.  I wonder who the parent company of the publisher is and if they have any asset connections to the intelligence community?  Only time will tell.

In the end, please remember that all forms of disinformation work best when used against uneducated, ignorant, gullible, naive and apathetic populations, which is primarily what many of us are, especially as related to these subject matters.

This type of disinformational program has been used quite extensively over the last six decades, but the real question here is; WHY IS IT BEING DONE NOW WITH SUCH INTENSITY?  WHAT IS IT THAT WE’RE NOT SUPPOSE TO BE PAYING ATTENTION TO NOW?