Ghost In The Box? NOT

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TESTING THE VALIDITY OF THE GHOST BOX AS A TOOL FOR PARANORMAL INVESTIGATION

Mitch Silverstein1, Stephanie Bohn1, Kenny Biddle2
1Nyack Paranormal- contact@nyackparanormal.com http://nyackparanormal.com
2ParaInvestigator- parainvestigator@comcast.net

February 21, 2015

ABSTRACT: The Ghost Box is a widely used device for paranormal investigating. We question the level of objectivity by those using this device. Respondents were sent a one minute recording from a Shack Hack Ghost Box and asked to respond to a questionnaire. We analyzed the results and explored the workings of these devices. The findings tell us that the interpretation of results by those who use this tool is very biased and subjective. The results collected in the field should not be put forth as evidence of paranormal activity.


INTRODUCTION

As a modern and portable version of the Frank’s Box by Frank Sumption (developed in 2002 for spirit communication [1]), the Ghost Box (also known as a Spirit Box) has been the center of debate for many years among ghost hunters and paranormal investigators. It debuted in the market somewhere around 2006 through TV show exposure; several designs have been developed since. Basically it is a portable battery operated radio which has been altered to scan the spectrum of radio frequencies within the range capable of the unit’s specifications. Early versions were an easy “hack” and more recent versions have added features such as an adjustable sweep speed and built in recorder. All in all they all do the same thing it was originally designed for, receiving radio broadcasts.

We will be conducting a series of experiments and research projects covering many of the tools that the typical paranormal investigator relies on for results.  Here we seek to test out the viability of the Ghost Box and report our interpretation of the findings. We believe that the level of bias in the interpretation of responses from the ghost box is high and subjective to the point that it cannot offer objective and useful data in an investigation.

METHOD

For this experiment we created a survey to seek feedback from an actual recording made with a Ghost Box. The request for participants was published on social media asking for help with a ghost box study. No details were provided at the time. Ninety eight (98) respondents were sent a questionnaire (Figure 1) to seek feedback from a one minute long Ghost Box recording (Link: http://nyackparanormal.com/GB/QuesAM.mp3 ). These respondents were randomly separated into two groups based on order of response.

The recording was made using a “Shack Hack” (Radio Shack Digital AM/FM Pocket Radio Catalog # 12-469: Figure 2) connected to a digital voice recorder (RCA Model VR5320R-A). The audio file was transferred to PC and converted to MP3 to match the original raw file, no manipulation or noise reduction was used. A one minute segment was captured for this experiment.

Group A would hear the one minute recording and Group B would hear the same recording with an additional three seconds of audio at the beginning that included the question: “What is your occupation?” There was no other manipulation to the recording or difference between the two sample recordings.

FIGURE 1- Survey Form

 

 


Photo: M. Silverstein

RESULTS

Group A had 19 completed responses out of 49 (39%) and group B had 17 responses out of 49 (35%).

The results of the survey were compiled into a spreadsheet (see Appendix) with the perceived words mapped out to their time stamp along with the survey answers.

We found that there were consistent words and/or sounds across the respondents reporting results. Table 1 shows the words and/or sounds with two or more like responses located within 4 seconds of their timestamps.

TABLE 1- Words from multiple responses

                                                                             Of all responders/36       Responders hearing words/18

1-4 sec          will, we’ll, well, wheels                   (8/36=22%).                         44%

4-5                 voice, sports, porch                         (4/36=11%)                           22%

20-22             problem, problems                          (9/36=25%)                          50%

25                  mom                                                 (2/36=6%)                             12%

26-27             polka, OK, hey look                          (3/36=8%)                         16%

35-37             cyst, sis or sit                                   (10/36=28%}                        56%

39-40             snow or no                                       (5/36=14%)                         28%       

52-55             backward, Blackburn, actor             (6/36=17%)                      34%

56-59             What if, what is, when it, etc          (8/36=22%)                       44%

Of these responses we noted:

Group A- those noting a response (n=10): Mean 6.6 responses each were noted.

Group B- those noting a response (n=8): Mean 3.6 responses each were noted.

Statistical Analysis:

The mean number of responses from each group was run through a t-test [2] to see if the results are considered statistically significant. The average number of words heard for each group was put through the calculation (Table 2); Group A heard an average of almost twice as many words (174%) as Group B but the difference is not statistically significant solely because of the small sample size (as an exercise, we increased the total number of respondents yet kept the same ratio of words heard and the results were statistically significant).

Table 2- Statistical calculator based on the T-test at 0.05 Level of Significance.
Testing for Statistical Significance in Controlled Experiments

 

TRENDS

Trend 1

Group A- # people reporting responses vs no responses
10 out of 19                                                               53%

Group B- # people reporting responses vs no responses
9 out of 18                                                                 50%

We found this interesting that both groups are about even in value. These show the groups were well sorted by random distribution.

Trend 2

One participant deemed the Ghost Box as an effective tool for investigating=3%. 61% stated it is ineffective and 36% are undecided of the responses to this question (Table 3).

Table 3- Survey Responses

E/I/U= Effective, Ineffective, undecided

Group A               E              I              U             n= 19 (one (1) no response to this question) 18

                              1              10           7

 

Group B               E              I              U             n= 18 (three (3) with no response to this question) 15

                               0              10           5

 

Overall                E              I              U             n=37 (33 responses)

                            1              20           12

                            3%          61%         36%

 

DISCUSSION

Generally the use of the Ghost box in paranormal investigation is inherently subjective and the units are flawed in design.

We did see a trend that showed bias towards seeking a specific response based on the question asked of the “spirits.” The difference can be attributed to confirmation bias [3]. Group B that was posed the question would have been specifically listening for a response that would fit the question. They may not report words that did not fit the suspected answer besides the most obvious. This coincides with our hypothesis but the sample size is too small to lend statistical significance to these findings.

Only one respondent stated the ghost box is considered an effective tool. 36% are undecided as to the effectiveness of the ghost box as a tool and the rest, more than half at 61%, stated it was ineffective. There seems to be little confidence in this sampling that any results of value can be obtained.

Random Words

The divergence between some of the sets of sound-alike words is interesting to note; it illustrates how responses may be open to interpretation. Table 5 shows the sets of words and phrases that were heard at the same time by multiple participants.

Table 5- Word Sets

1. Voice, sports, porch, course, boy.

2. Wheels, will, we all, we’ll keep, well, we’ll.

3. Wiccan, breaking, Courtney, court case.

4. Trouble, problem, problems, cobblestone, hobbit soup.

5. Polka, OK, hey look.

6. Sit, assist, upstairs, sis, cyst.

7. Snow, no.

8. Backwards, whatever, blackburn, actor.

9. Wooden, what if, when it, one of, what is.

Apart from the contents of Table 5, and even more interesting, we were able to find four random words with no sound-alike words whatsoever. Three of these words were heard during the recording without the question (Group A); “Jennifer,” “recall,” and “key.” The fact that it was a name, Jennifer; a quasi-command, recall; and something mysterious, like a key; was interesting because it was as if their subconscious mind was trying to form something that might have meaning to the investigator or to the spirit, possibly out of nothing. One random word was heard during the recording with the question (Group B), “What is your occupation?”, the word “end,” which could be seen as pertaining to the state of one’s employment. Hearing the question resulted in a word that was possibly drawn from the imagination and not hearing the question caused the mind to grasp for words of meaning in general.

Additionally, in regards to all other responses, being influenced by the question could cause a word that sounds like “backwards” to sound like “actor.” Many more responses were heard in general when the ears of the participants were not specifically listening for the answer to a question.

The Radio

Many words did come out clearly from the recording, likely a strong radio broadcast signal. Also, several were two syllables showing that even a quick scan allows many full words to be heard. We were curious as to how multiple words or phrases have been reported from the use of these instruments so we also tested what we call the frequency overlap, where a broadcast station is strong enough, and the receiver is of the level of quality, to pick up the same broadcast on the adjoining frequencies both lower and higher on the dial.

Scan Test

A manual scan one station at a time was done with the Shack Hack and the very popular P-SB7 (Table 4). For the Shack Hack it was noted that the FM station at 107.1 was also coming through rather clear at 106.9 and 107.3.  Due to strict broadcasting regulations we can assume it is the nature of the radio tuner possibly coupled with atmospheric conditions that may cause this. The target frequencies were typically stronger than the cohorts. More stations with the same effect were found at approximately FM MHz: 90.5-90.7-90.9; 92.7-92.9; 94.1-94.3-94.5; 96.5-96.7-96.9; 97.1-97.3; 98.1-98.3-98.5; 99.5-99.7; 100.5-100.7-100.9; 106.3-106.5

AM KHz: 540-550; 570-580; 660-670-680; 770-780; 880-890; 970-980; 1010-1020; 1050-1060; 1130-1140; 1220-1230-1240; 1550-1560-1570

Figure 3- The P-SB7

Photo: ghoststop.com

With the P-SB7, there was no noticeable overlap along the AM dial, however, with FM, every station broadcast received overlapped with the frequency immediately before & after the designated frequency:  88.5, 89.3, 89.5, 89.7, 90.1, 90.5, 90.9, 91.7, 92.5, 93.3, 93.7, 94.1, 94.5, 95.7, 96.5, 96.9, 97.1, 97.5, 98.1, 98.9, 99.5, 100.3, 100.7, 101.1, 101.5, 102.1, 102.5, 102.9, 103.3, 103.9, 104.5, 105.3, 106.1, 106.9, 107.9
The stronger signals came in on either side of the target frequency almost as clear as the target frequency, easily allowing several syllables and multiple words to be heard at times, depending on the “Sweep Rate” setting. 

Table 4- The description of the popular P-SB7

P-SB7 “ITC Research Device” (as printed on the device)

Eight buttons are provided on the front;

Sweep Rate – Allows the speed to which the device sweeps/scans through frequencies to be adjusted. Sweep rates of 100 ms to 350 ms are available for FM, and 200 ms to 500 ms are available for AM. Both adjust in 50 ms increments.

Back Light – Provides a blue backlight for the LCD screen.

Sweep FWD – Starts the device sweeping through frequencies from lowest to highest. Also allows user to cycle through frequencies manually.

Sweep REV – Starts the devices sweeping through frequencies from highest to lowest. Also allows user to cycle through frequencies manually.
Vol. “+” – Increases volume (Level 30)

Vol. “-“ – Decreases volume

AM/FM – Switches device between receiving AM (KHz) and FM (MHz) frequencies. Available AM frequencies are between 530 KHz and 1710 KHz (119 frequencies). Available FM frequencies are between 76.0 MHz and 108.0 MHz (311 frequencies).

The frequency overlap effectively increases the exposure of any of these radio stations to the scan process.

We also tested this with an unmodified Radio Shack Multi-band Radio Catalog # 20-230. FM frequencies showed much of the same overlapping of frequencies: 90.5-90.7-90.9; 94.1-94.3-94.5; 96.5-96.7-96.9; 97.1-97.3; 98.1-98.3-98.5; 106.3-106.5, however, none of the AM band showed this characteristic, similar to the P-SB7. It does seem this is much a function of the quality of the tuner in the radio. The different models of the ghost box should be checked for these patterns. It seems the ‘cheaper’ radios may have less frequency accuracy. This would expose the Ghost Box listener to a much longer listen at broadcast frequencies increasing the chance of catching longer, clearer words or phrases.

Although using the AM band may mitigate frequency overlap typical of the FM band, AM broadcasts are generally more news and talk shows which increase the chances of catching a spoken word. Both bands have their disadvantages with little or no advantage over the other especially if the unit only provides single band access. These units should have a way to record the frequency at which these words are perceived so one can go back to those stations and review the context of their broadcast.

Coupled with the findings from the frequency overlap, the speed of the scan can make a difference in the interpretation of responses. The newest models of the Ghost Box claim the scan speed can be set to a faster rate than words can be formed or spoken.

Scan Speed

According to our findings, the Shack Hack scans at 5 frequencies per second or 200ms (Figure 4) and two syllable words were easily understood. Either the word(s) spanned 200ms (1/5 of a second) or it spanned two or more adjoining frequencies (up to 600ms or more).

Figure 4- Audio file showing peaks designating the scan rate for the Shack Hack

 

From Scientific American- “When we speak rapidly we are verbalizing at about six syllables per second. That hyperactive radio announcer spewing fine print at the end of a commercial jabbers at 10 syllables per second, the absolute limit of comprehension for sighted people.” Blind people have been found in the same study to be able to comprehend up to 19 syllables/second.[4]

From Wiki: Speakers vary their speed of speaking according to contextual and physical factors. A typical speaking rate for English is 4 syllables per second,[5] but in different emotional or social contexts the rate may vary, one study reporting a range between 3.3 and 5.9 syl/sec,[6] Another study found significant differences in speaking rate between story-telling and taking part in an interview.[7]

These studies and measures show there is a strong possibility and supporting evidence that single and multiple syllables could be heard from the scanning process. Even the  faster scanning units available (down to 50ms) can capture discernible syllables and with frequency overlap, coincidence of context to neighboring broadcasts and a biased ear, words and phrases will be heard. Those investigators claiming longer sentences or phrases must scrutinize the source of their findings in great detail.

Radio Broadcasts

We have also heard many investigators state that there are little or no radio signals in the area they are investigating so any response from the ghost box must be a spirit. In most cases the investigation takes place at night. AM frequencies travel much greater distances due to the bouncing off of the ionosphere in the evening and night time hours. This has led to stricter standards for radio broadcasters with powerful transmitters to reduce power during these hours. There are still distant signals that travel farther during the high point of use for the ghost box. [8] FM signals are effectively stronger and lower to the ground and carry better through buildings. Due to the nature of the wave it holds up much better than AM against noise and interference making words come through more clearly. As an unscientific attempt to see how strong radio signals are at night, we placed the ghost box inside a totally stainless steel dishwasher in an attempt to reduce the reception on the radio but we still picked up most stations with little or no reduction in reception quality.

CONCLUSION

Although a larger sampling of participants would strengthen the support of our hypothesis, we conclude there is enough information to state the Ghost Box is not a proper research tool for paranormal investigating due to the strong bias involved in the use and interpretation of the responses in the field. The intended use of the Ghost Box lends little or no control over the many inherent variables and it solely relies on subjective opinions as to what results are considered valid. The units are flawed in the sense that it will generate syllables by default which guarantees a user with belief in the device will interpret it as a spirit response. We do not present this research to suggest to people what to believe in, we merely support the facts and evidence that perceived results from the ghost box should remain a personal experience and should not be presented as supporting evidence of paranormal activity nor be included in any scientific methodology. Those presenting evidence based on Ghost Box recordings will bear the burden of proof that their findings support their beliefs.

 REFERENCES

1. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/aaron-sagers/inventor-of-franks-box-gh_b_5689238.html

2. Statistical Significance Calculator By Rags Srinivasan

3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias

4. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-can-some-blind-people-process/

5. Cruttenden, A. (2014). Gimson’s Pronunciation of English. Routledge. p. 54.

6. Arnfield, S.; Roach, Setter, Greasley and Horton (1995). “Emotional stress and speech tempo variability”. Proceedings of the ESCA/NATO Workshop on Speech Under Stress: 13–15.

7. Kowal, S.; Wiese and O’Donnell (1983). “The use of time in storytelling”. Language and Speech 26.4: 377–392.

8. http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/why-am-radio-stations-must-reduce-power-change-operations-or-cease-broadcasting-night

  1. 3.     
    APPENDIX- Distribution of responses by responder.

Dr. Barry Taff: A Veteran Of The Psychic Wars

By

Sean Casteel and John Weigle

Dr. Barry Taff has been on the forefront of the academic study of psychic phenomena for decades and has long documented the connection between psi events and UFOs. His own psychic experiences began in childhood, and he has no doubt of the reality of some form of coupling between human consciousness and a field of energy that we do not as yet understand.

Taff spoke on March 9, 2013, at a meeting of the Close Encounter Research Organization, which earlier this year added the word “international” to its name and is seeking to branch out worldwide in the dissemination of UFO and alien abduction information. The meeting was held in Thousand Oaks, California, a city located just north of Los Angeles.

Taff opened his lecture by reciting part of a poem by T.S. Elliot that Taff felt eloquently expressed the fluid nature of time and the human mind:

“Time present and time past,” the poem reads, in part, “Are both perhaps present in time future. And time future contained in time past. If all time is eternally present, All time is unredeemable. What might have been is an abstraction, Remaining a perpetual possibility.”

Taff moved on to declare, “There is no paranormal. It’s normal.” He said that long-term memories are not stored in our brains, they’re kept in a remote source outside of us, which relates to the T.S. Elliot poem and his grappling with the nature of memory and time.

From there, Taff began to recount his own history of psychic experiences, beginning with an incident that happened when he was ten years old. In grade school, a young girl approached him and he asked her what the weird bag was that she was wearing. He didn’t know at that age that such a bag was used after a colostomy. The young girl screamed and told the principal, who called Taff into his office and asked if he had looked under the girl’s dress or sneaked into the girls’ bathroom. Taff told the principal he had x-ray vision and pointed out that he could see that the principal had unhealed keloid scar tissue himself. The principal then called Taff’s parents, and they said, “Don’t ask.”

Taff joked that if he had a dollar for every one of his psychic experiences, he would be a whole lot wealthier.

As a child, Taff predicted the assassination of John Kennedy to his parents a couple of years before the event. His parents insisted on making a bet in the belief that young Taff would be proven wrong. They didn’t speak to Taff for ten days, he said, after the prediction came true.

In 1968, Taff was visiting a girlfriend at her house when he decided he wanted some iced tea, which his girlfriend didn’t keep around. At that same moment, Taff’s father saw Taff enter the house, go to the refrigerator and drink iced tea from the pitcher. But Taff had never left his girlfriend’s house. Although his parents never drank iced tea, the pitcher was partially empty the next morning, as though someone had drank from it prior to Taff’s seeing the pitcher of tea the next day.

It was difficult to photograph Taff as a child, he said, and once, when he and a colleague were visiting a TV show producer, a photograph was taken of Taff and his colleague in which the other person showed up perfectly but where Taff had been standing the photo showed only a flash of light.

With this strange history behind him, Taff became a researcher of psychic phenomena in an academic setting, eventually earning a doctorate in psychophysiology with a minor in biomedical engineering from UCLA in 1975. From 1970 to 1987, he was involved in the study of remote viewing.

“What we saw blew us away,” he said.

When using the techniques of remote viewing, according to Taff, both past and future information are available, and it is possible to see information from a great distance. The evidence suggests that our brain, consciousness and space-time work in the same way. As part of the testing of remote viewing, Taff and his associates were given remote viewing “targetsand when they reported what they saw, they provided   information on Trident submarines. The tape recordings made of the remote viewing experiments were later confiscated by representatives of an unnamed intelligence agency because of the classified details contained therein. Taff and his group later performed additional work for intelligence agencies with mixed results.

Unfortunately, Taff said, when understanding the implications of remote viewing and the nature of time, one is forced to conclude that there is no such thing as free will. He offered a story by way of example. In college, he was working with a girl in the psych lab when he had a dream of her going home and being involved in a car accident. In the dream, he saw a driver he thought was himself, so he broke off the relationship in the hope that he could change the future. The girl got involved with another man, and he was the driver in the accident that occurred. Nothing could alter the fulfillment of the precognitive dream, and thus the will of the participants was not free.

“I’ve lost a lot of friends and colleagues because of my work in this field,” Taff lamented, because they were frightened or put off by what he said or things that occurred in his presence.

Taff’s work on the case that became the novel “The Entity” brought him some degree of fame. In August 1974, he and some of his colleagues in parapsychology met a woman who said her house was haunted and that she had been repeatedly raped by ghosts. Taff wrote a big “P” on her report form, meaning he considered it a psychiatric case. Then the woman’s neighbors started seeing things. A skillet flew out of a cupboard. The bedroom felt like it was refrigerated, but it wasn’t. There was an odor of decaying matter. A green light double the size of Taff’s fist appeared and slowly turned into the form of an upper torso. When it disappeared, two of Taff’s assistants passed out.

The team later sealed off the rooms to prevent any light from coming in and prepared a grid on the walls so they could pinpoint any strange things that happened. They shot hundreds of frames of film that showed nothing unusual, but everyone saw things in the room during the filming. The team members wrote down their observations before conferring together and found that their stories matched when they discussed them.

Taff helped write the eventual novel “The Entity,” saying that not everything in the book actually happened. He appears as the slightly fictionalized character “Gene Kraft.” A movie starring Barbara Hershey and Ron Silver was released in 1983. A capsule recounting of the plot is included in “Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide” that reads, in part, “A woman is raped repeatedly by a giant, invisible mass. Her psychiatrist thinks it’s all in the mind until parapsychologists set a trap for the critter.”

There is an article posted on Taff’s website at http://barrytaff.net entitled “The Psi-UFO Connection: What On Earth Is Going On?” In it, Taff writes of a rather fascinating yet obscure relationship between paranormal experiences and UFO encounters.

“Why is it that many CE-III’s and IV’s have paranormal fallout following the event?” he asks. “Why is it that certain people who have frequent paranormal experiences are more likely to experience a UFO encounter?”

Taff goes on to say that it is obviously not scientifically valid to try to explain one phenomenon by recourse to the other, but there is a “longitudinal continuity” between the two kinds of events that may one day help to explain them both.

In his lecture to CERO International, he offered the case history of Judy, another woman with whom he was romantically involved. There is a more detailed version of the story in the aforementioned article on his website.

“I met a beautiful girl on Valentine’s Day (1977) while investigating a case in the mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles,” Taff writes. “This girl was so physically stunning to me that it was impossible to stop staring at her.”

The case he was investigating was a very weak one and no follow up work was done. But he and Judy ended up in a very intense relationship. As time passed, there were repeated episodes of RSPK (Recurrent Spontaneous Psycho-Kinesis) activity culminating in “a large glowing sphere of light emerging from the lumbar region of her back” while Taff was giving her a massage. The clocks in Judy’s condo would all frequently “desynchronize” and run at different speeds.

“All of this paranormal activity was kind of an added bonus to being in a relationship with her,” Taff writes. “At least I thought it was. Boy, was I wrong.”

Taff writes that they both felt it was a perfect relationship and that Judy turned out to be a gifted psychic who also worked with the psi training groups at the UCLA lab as well as on missing persons cases. Taff expected that he and Judy would be engaged within six months, but “fate had something else in mind.” He began to have repeated precognitive dreams in which he was given the message that their romance would end on July 22, 1977. The reasons for the split were never provided in the dreams.

He never told Judy about the dreams because she might misinterpret what he said as expressing a desire to leave her. The dreams stopped, and his happiness was restored. When July 22 came around, he had almost forgotten the dreams entirely. He awoke to find Judy beside him in bed, sobbing and shivering under the covers. She asked Taff why he hadn’t helped her the previous night.

When Taff asked her what she meant, she told him that she “had awakened to find the room brilliantly lit, but the lights were not on. She was levitated up out of the bed, eventually finding herself in a round, metallic-walled room where she was strapped to a metallic table around her wrists, neck, ankles and abdomen. There were tiny men who had skin like a snake or reptile and a face without ears or noses, with large black eyes, who were poking and prodding her everywhere, but especially in every bodily orifice.”

Judy could hear the little men speaking though their lipless mouths were not moving.

“They kept saying that they weren’t going to hurt her, even though that’s exactly what they were doing. The next thing she remembered was waking up in bed with me soundly sleeping next to her.”

Taff writes that he asked her if she knew anything about UFO abductions, which she did not. Although she was very interested in the paranormal, UFOs held no interest for her. Taff finally coaxed her out from beneath the covers and was shocked to find that Judy had bruises at her neck, waist, wrists, abdomen and ankles – consistent with her claim that she had been restrained on the metallic table. And she was bleeding from every orifice, bearing out her story that she had been poked and prodded in those same locations.

Judy subsequently had a complete breakdown, “becoming almost totally delusional with overt signs of dissociation. She never sought any help from anyone and she never, even marginally, recovered. She became a religious zealot, but of a very unusual type. Needless to say, our relationship ended on that day, just as my dream had predicted. From occasional contact with her over the subsequent years, she claims to have been re-abducted many times. It’s one thing to lose a potential mate, but not to something like this.”

At the CERO International lecture, Taff touched on another case that he also writes about in the same online article. He received a phone call in the mid-1970s from a local television network executive who complained about poltergeist activity in his home. Over time, he reported occasional luminous anomalies, disembodied voices, banging noises and problems with electrical items in the house. Both the executive and his family seemed “quite grounded, normal, stable and well-adjusted.” Eventually the man’s calls ceased. Then one night, while the man and his wife were on a road trip in northern California, they saw what they thought was a small, burning plane about to crash into the hills to their right.

“They drove up to where they assumed the plane had crashed,” Taff writes, “and after rounding a bend, they ran into a very unexpected sight. A shocking and terrifying visage to say the least. Sitting on the ground in front of them was a classic flying saucer, maybe 30 to 50 feet in diameter. And if that wasn’t difficult to enough to absorb, there were several diminutive humanoids in tight-fitting flight suits moving around the area around the saucer, as if looking for something. The beings were about four feet tall with grayish-brown skin, large, black almond-shaped eyes with no apparent nose or outer ears. Classic grays in every respect.”

Suddenly, several of the humanoids became aware of the man and his wife sitting in their car observing the scene. One of the creatures pointed a tubular-shaped object at the couple that emitted a bright light. The next thing the pair remembered was being back on the highway many miles away and several hours later.

After experiencing this classic abduction scenario, the two began to have   disturbing dreams about their missing time, most of which they were reluctant to discuss with anyone. They sought psychological counseling but were assumed by mental health workers to have both had a psychotic break, for which medication was recommended. The abduction experience was little known in the mid-1970s, so this response from the mental health community is not surprising, Taff writes.

The man and his wife began to experience strong emotional mood swings, indicative of dramatically altered personalities. They eventually divorced, with the husband becoming particularly volatile and erratic, which led to his leaving his lucrative job in television in a newfound state of anxiety, anger and bitterness. What had begun as poltergeist activity had progressed to an alien UFO abduction and left great misery in its wake.

“We’re dealing with something far more advanced than we are,” Taff added during his lecture, “and technology that is like magic to us.”

But change is not the goal in physical science, he said, pointing to the fact that hardly anyone in mainstream science takes these issues seriously. There exists an inverse correlation between belief and whether new ideas will work, he said. What the scientists say won’t work will and what they say will work won’t. Imagine what would happen if a vehicle was unveiled tomorrow that used an entirely new form of energy. We need what Taff called “a change in the way we perceive normality.”

UFOs are the most classified information the government has, he continued. Add gray aliens to the mix of our own racial and ethnic problems, and one can imagine the results. We should not fear an alien invasion so much as the problems we’ve created for ourselves.

Both psychic phenomena and UFO contact involve an energy of a type we don’t understand, Taff said toward the end of his lecture. Most people are not sensitive to it and can live a long time without ever having any experiences with it. Others are sensitive to it.

“It’s there,” Taff said. “It’s real. We are always a (central) part of the equation.”

[Dr. Barry Taff is the author of the book “Aliens Above, Ghosts Below.” The website for CERO International is at www.cerointernational.com  Sean Casteel has a website at www.seancasteel.com]

Disinforming The Paranormal and Ufology

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

You all know what disinformation is, right?  This method, commonly used in war-fighting and intelligence work, is VERY important to consider when dealing with the paranormal and ufology, as it appears that the powers that be want to keep the public both uninformed and misdirected on these topics.

Disinformation is when people are fed erroneous information regarding a specific subject(s) with the intention of creating an illusory reality so as to misdirect ones’ attention from one event onto another, or to obfuscate the truth with a generic lie.

One method is where a major lie is surrounded with many truthful facts.  When the truths are proven to be genuine, the lie in their midst is taken along for the same ride and believed to be authentic.

Another common method is where a great truth is encapsulated amongst many lies. When the lies are proven to be misinformation, the truth is also believed to be a lie.

As simple as these disinformational methods appear, they work very effectively on people who are conditioned to believe in what they’re told by authority figures, are uneducated, ignorant or generally apathetic about things they don’t know much about.  It’s often necessary to read between-the-lines when governments are officially pontificating or sponsors are advertising their products on TV.  I’m sure that we”re all quite familiar with the term “truth in advertising”, right?

One relatively recent instance involved our government’s officially terminating it’s remote viewing program some time ago.  Afterwords, they hired some professional debunkers (whose names have been omitted here to avoid any legal consequences) to re-evaluate the results from the many years of research and application.

Once these debunkers finished their manipulation of this program’s statistics, it suddenly appeared as if the entire remote viewing program was little more than an experiment in stupidity, gullibility and naivety coupled with an error in judgment and reasoning on the part of our military and intelligence community (which of course is always possible when dealing with any government).

These debunkers then claimed that with their “corrected” statistics, all the years of significantly positive qualitative and quantitative results were actually meaningless dogma and amounted to little more than the work of ignorant zealots who were misinterpreting their own data.   One may ask why our government even resorted to disinformation regarding such an underfunded and poorly utilized intelligence program? The reason is rather simple and yet complicated at the same time.

Even after all the development work, numerous experiments and applied usage of remote viewing, no one really understood how and why it worked, and why, on occasion, it failed.  Our scientific theories and models of space-time and consciousness are far too crude to encompass such extraordinary perceptual events.

However, the brilliant minds in our government wanted to insure that our immediate, as well as any potential future enemies, could never employ such non-localized spying techniques against us, as there are no known effective countermeasures against remote viewing.

The most efficient way to protect us against against future paranormal adversaries would be to make everyone believe that remote viewing never worked to begin with and that it’s nothing more than a waste of time, money, material and assets.  Yeah right?

During the initial phases of the remote viewing work, the United States Navy was so paranoid that Soviet psychic spies could penetrate into our deep diving boomers (nuclear ballistic missile submarines) and the Strategic Air Command’s underground ICBM launch complexes to psychically force (remote influence) our servicemen into pushing the wrong buttons or not pushing any buttons at all, that the military were actually trying to design and develop talisman and/or amulets to be worn by servicemen in sensitive positions to shield their minds from being remotely controlled.

However, I seriously doubt as to whether such ridiculously absurd countermeasure efforts produced any results.  This may really sound off the wall, but it’s true.

But this is what tends to occur when we’re dealing with a subject that is not fully understood, other than being aware of some of its immediate, although limited, applications.  As to whether the debunker’s efforts succeeded regarding remote viewing we may never know, but that doesn’t mean that they won’t keep attempting such similar efforts.

For far more detailed information regarding the nefarious and devious methods employed by our own intelligence community to discredit the voluminous data collected in remote viewing research, read another blog on this site entitled “Remote Viewing: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”.

Disinformation can be used in many different ways, but the two most common forms of it’s use are the following.   A significant truth is surrounded with many lies, and once said lies are uncovered and exposed as falsehoods, the truth within the middle of them is discarded and forgotten as little more than just another of the many lies. The inverse, is where a powerful lie is surrounded with considerable truths, and when the surrounding truths are confirmed as factual, the lie within the middle is also believed to be factual.

A simple way of describing the essence of the disinformational method is a line from an episode of the original Star Trek series entitled “I,  Mudd”, wherein Kirk utters the following fascinating words to an android bent on controlling and stealing the Enterprise; “Everything I’m saying to you is a lie and I’m lying to you now”.  Confusing, disturbing and certainly disorienting, but nonetheless, effective.  Precise, concise and succinct, is not it not?

Most people are probably not aware of the fact that our government’s intelligence apparatus has dramatically affected media such as newspapers,  television and radio to disinform the public regarding UFOs for many decades.  One of the best sources of information on this topic are two books written by Richard M. Dolan; UFOs and the National Security State, Vol. 1 & 2.

Apparently, the powers that be do not want the public to believe in the existence of UFOs or aliens.  The reasons for this attitude on the part of our government are numerous, and many of these are discussed in Dolans’ excellent books as well as my own.  Ever notice how at the end of almost every TV news story on UFOs there is a line thrown out by the reporter ridiculing the entire matter?

During a UFO flap that occurred during the mid-1990’s there was one report that came in of a large, glowing object hovering over someones home in the mid-west.  The object in question was probably even bigger than the house it hovered over, yet the media suggested that what people really saw was the moon or the planet Venus.  What?

If a person cannot differentiate between the moon that they’ve seen all their life or a distant light in the sky (Venus) and a very large, structured, glowing object hovering over their home, they need to be institutionalized, as they’ve lost their mind and are now psychotic.

This brings me to the most current bit of moronic, idiotic and downright historically absurd piece of disinformation I’ve ever seen regarding UFOs.   A new book written by Annie Jacobsen, Area 51,  goes into some detail discussing many previously classified military/intelligence programs at Nellis Air Force Base’s Groom Lake and Area 51.   Much of what Jacobsen writes of is very precise, historically accurate but already established within the public domain long before her book was even written , except when it speaks of UFOs and the 1947 Roswell, New Mexico crash.

The Air Force has spun numerous tall tales in their attempt to obfuscate the truth about Roswell.  At first, it was just a weather balloon.  Then, several decades later, the story was changed to something called “Project Mogul”, a high-altitude surveillance balloon used to monitor nuclear tests within the old Soviet Union before we had spy planes and satellites.

But wait, that didn’t account for the diminutive alien bodies allegedly recovered from the crash site.  The next level of disinformational spin from the Air Force was that the strangely colored bodies were nothing more than crash dummies utilized to test new types of ejection seats on supersonic aircraft.

Wait a minute, the crash dummies (full sized, not little humanoids as described by Roswell witnesses) were not even used by the Air Force until the mid-to-late 1950’s, so how could this explain the bodies recovered at Roswell in 1947?

Oh, well it seems that the people who claimed to have seen the bodies really couldn’t remember what decade they were in at the time and mistakenly thought it was 1947, when it was actually 1955-1958?  Sure, we can all lose a decade or so every now and then.  Happens every day, right?  Or is it every decade?  How stupid do these government liars really think we are?   Pretty damn stupid and ignorant apparently.

Jacobsen’s book spins the tale that the Soviets, with the help of Dr. Joseph Mengele from Nazi Germany, helped them genetically engineer some tiny, alien looking human pilots that they inserted into a makeshift spacecraft that was derived from the Horton brother’s flying wing design for the Nazi Luftwaffe at the end of WWII.

This piloted vehicle was then purposefully crashed in the New Mexican desert in the hope of triggering mass hysteria and panic across the United States similar to what occurred during Orson Well’s 1938 War of The Worlds radio broadcast.

My god, these people are working in the wrong profession, as they should really be science fiction writers within the entertainment industry.  Interesting story to say the least, but full of more holes than a large block of Swiss cheese.  Where to begin?

Let’s see, Joseph Mengele did NOT go to the Soviet Union at the end of second world war.  There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever suggesting that Mengele even desired to go to the Soviet Union, or that they wanted to get their hands on a real alien body that the Nazi’s might have recovered from an alleged, unconfirmed crash of a UFO in 1936 within Germany’s Black Forrest.

Had Mengele even attempted to find sanctuary there, he would be been immediately killed.  He may have come to the U.S. for a while, but clearly ended up and died in Argentina.  How could anyone, including Mengele, have genetically engineered anything back in 1947 when DNA had not even been discovered yet?  That wasn’t until the early 1960’s.

Next, the first Horton Brothers 229 flying wing crashed during one of its’ early test flights in Germany due to its port engine failure.  The debris and a second, unfinished prototype, were brought to the U.S. along with the Horton brothers after the war.

In fact, Jack Northrop’s YB-49 flying wing, so beautifully depicted in the original War of the Worlds movie (1956) was, in many ways, derived from the Horton Brothers flying wing.  Due to some poorly clarified political backstabbing during the 1950’s, Northrop’s YB-49, which first flew in 1948, was never deployed into military service even though it apparently demonstrated superior aerodynamic qualities, greater ordinance capacity and higher cruising speeds on military power.  So far, Jacobsen’s batting zero.

One last note here regarding her claims.  The configuration depicted within her book representative of the crashed Roswell craft could not have flown based on any form of jet or rocket propulsion known back in 1947.

Additionally, the description of the Roswell crash material does not even conform to any type of aerospace materials that existed then or now, except some crude forms of memory metals currently in use, but they do not possess many of the qualities described by the individuals who held remnants of the real Roswell crash.  In the end, there’s one final question that needs to be addressed regarding Jacobsen and her book.

Is Jacobsen a mole working for the U.S. government’s military/intelligence apparatus or, is she just a naive, gullible and relatively ignorant reporter who is being used by our government to propagate more erroneous myths and disinformation?

Given that she’s a writer/reporter for the Los Angeles Times newspaper, what better way to be unwittingly used than as an asset for our government as they already are familiarized with how our government’s used the media to disinform the public regarding UFOs?  Either of these possibilities are equally plausible.

However, lending support to the latter of these possibilities was the appearance a new show “Area 51 Declassified” on the National Geographic Channel last Sunday evening, for which Jacobsen was a consultant.  Given the coordination between the release of her book and the immediate broadcast of this show, strongly suggests that this entire matter is a very well orchestrated disinformational campaign put forth by factions within our government.

Reinforcing this belief was the airing of a two-hour National Geographic show entitled “When Aliens Attack”, immediately preceding the Area 51 show.  Why in the world this show was produced is really a mystery.

“When Aliens Attack” posited the unlikely scenario that the Earth will be invaded and conquered by malevolent extraterrestrial life forms in search of protein and chlorophyll, and that we have already prepared a battle plan or contingency combat strategy to deal with such an event.

For a government that’s been denying the very existence of UFOs and aliens for more than sixty years, why are they even planning for such potential hostilities?  That’s the equivalent of planning for Godzilla’s or Rodan’s hostile actions (and remember, they’re movie monsters).

Given how long it normally takes to successfully pitch, sell, produce and air a show on TV (especially on this subject), this whole matter stinks to high heaven of a well organized project to dramatically rewrite history and misdirect our attention in order to dissuade us from believing in UFOs and their occupants.  Jacobsen’s publisher has put forth an extraordinarily intense PR media campaign on this book.  I wonder who the parent company of the publisher is and if they have any asset connections to the intelligence community?  Only time will tell.

In the end, please remember that all forms of disinformation work best when used against uneducated, ignorant, gullible, naive and apathetic populations, which is primarily what many of us are, especially as related to these subject matters.

This type of disinformational program has been used quite extensively over the last six decades, but the real question here is; WHY IS IT BEING DONE NOW WITH SUCH INTENSITY?  WHAT IS IT THAT WE’RE NOT SUPPOSE TO BE PAYING ATTENTION TO NOW?